Posts Tagged ‘Work’

Finishing Team Supervisor Myerstown PA


Keystone Collections by Martins.

In an economy where jobs are scarce, we are proud to be retained in assisting this profitable company with filling this very import position. Please apply directly using the contact information below. Principles only, no agencies or recruiters thank you. Keystone Collections by Martins is an equal opportunity employer.

Keystone Collections by Martins, Myerstown PA manufacturing location is currently seeking a Finishing Team Supervisor to join its Team. The Finish Team Supervisor is responsible for the quality level of the product, meeting the due date of the product, morale of the team, efficiency of the operation, and future growth of production.

Some of the duties of this position include:

  • Directs the day-to-day activities of departmental personnel with respect to production volume, flow, cost, quality and on time delivery dates.
  • Maintains accurate time records to ensure accurate job costing for the department.
  • Closes daily schedules on time and maintains proper paperwork flow with in the department.
  • Monitors production reports to ensure achievement of financial, safety, quality and on-time delivery goals.
  • Create and maintain a positive work environment which fosters high morale.
  • Use strong communication skills, leadership, and coaching techniques to accomplish quality goals and exceed productivity standards.

Preferred Qualifications:

  • 2 years leadership experience
  • Well organized, able to multitask with deadlines on most
  • Ability to expend the time to complete the job on time
  • Ability to travel on company business which might include overnight stays
  • Ability to be discrete, emphatic, and diplomatic
  • Physical ability to walk long distances, stand for long periods of time and work in areas with light dust, heat, chemicals and moderate noise levels

Send resumes in the strictest of confidence to: HR@INHISNAMEHR.com

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Integrate - Performance Reviews for Success

Integrate — Performance Reviews for Success


Integrate — Performance Reviews for Success

Probably one of the least liked HR processes of all organizations is the dreaded performance review. However, it does not have to be that way. Performance reviews should be beneficial not only to the organization but to the employee.

Key components to a successful process include:

  • Built-in commitment to your MVV
  • Shared goals and objectives throughout the organization
  • Employee ownership of career and job performance
  • Simplistic but meaningful processes
  • Solid guidelines and commitment from senior leadership.

Commitment to your MVV

If you want your Team to fulfill your Company’s Mission reach your Vision and operate within your Values, you must build these into the Performance Review process. When you do, it shows the organization that leadership believes in the MVV so much that they have included it in the measurement of employment performance. Ensure your goals and objectives are aligned with your Missionand Vision; if they are not, you must question why they are in place. Most organizations that we support appreciate us walking them through a simple Strengths, Weaknesses, Opportunities, and Threats (SWOT) analysis to help develop goals for the organization. In the area of Values, always build your values and other important values into the behavior section of the Performance review form; we will discuss behaviors in more detail later in this chapter.

Shared goals and objectives

In high performing organizations, including those that I have worked for, have all had Performance Review processes that were aligned to shared goals and objectives through the organization. Typically the scenario worked like this: The CEO would develop four to six goals and objectives that would then be approved or renegotiated by the board of directors. Those goals would then cascade through the organization all the way down to, for example, the third-shift sanitation employee at the plant in Arkansas. The employees would then align what they needed to accomplish within their scope of authority against the goals of the person(s) above them.

The review process primarily focuses on annual goals, and very little on the mundane aspects of day to day work that is reflective of what the job description dictates. The daily work should be accomplished, and, if not, the employee should be managed through disciplinary procedures.

Employee ownership 

I have had the experience of employees approaching me earlier in my career at the end of the performance review cycle. Oftentimes, their approach was because they never had met with their managers even one time during the course of the performance cycle.

Make no mistake: they are at fault as much as their inept management. 

Employees must take ownership of their careers, their development and their performance. Those who do not simply will not survive in this economy. Part of ensuring that they take ownership, and helping them to understand it, is ensuring that the process is clearly defined, i.e., that the employee is obliged to prepare performance form materials, and be proactive in scheduling a performance review meeting with their manager if the manager is not. If the manager still fails to meet with them, the employee has an obligation to go to HR or, absent HR, the manager’s superior. Doing nothing should never be an option. 

Simplistic but meaningful processes

Twelve-page forms and manuals that exceed sixty pages will just not work. Ensure your process includes easily understood documentation, and a review form that does not exceed a good resume length, that is, two pages. Keep the form limited to four to six operational goals and three to five behavior-based goals.

Never have a process that is void of behavioral objectives. 

I have had the misfortune to work with several teams that insisted upon only production-related goals. They killed each other in the process to achieve them, and, when challenged,  they would always say that they were not being measured on niceness, but solely on how many widgets they made! Balance your performance scorecard, and you will have better results. 

Solid guidelines and commitment from senior leadership 

When we describe “solid” guidelines, we mean guidelines that are not created in a vacuum, by one person high on a mountaintop. Guidelines should be developed by a cross-functional group of employees from a variety of areas within the company. This brings a rich blend of thoughts and experiences to the table.

Regrettably, most of the HR people that I have worked with during my career are just not capable of coming up with such solid guidelines without assistance.

It is a sad statement to make regarding my profession, but I gave up defending much of the deficiencies I discovered years ago.

Senior Leadership must buy into the process and support it. If they don’t, it is doomed to certain failure.

Years ago, I worked for a company in which, no matter how hard the CEO worked on convincing the president of a particular division to manage the performance review process, this president would balk. The division president’s lack of commitment transcended the organization. The process became a joke, and no one nurtured it. I look back at the company now and wonder if things could have turned out differently. They have closed half of their plants, and shed several thousand employees. It might be a stretch to link this to lack of leadership in embracing a performance review process, but I do believe that, if Innovation was a top goal for the years heading into the downturn, that company could conceivably have created new products to sustain employment for those who were laid off. Sad, but this is often the case. Managers: stay committed!

What has been your experience with performance review systems? Do you like them? Hate them? We would like to know. Please leave us a few comments to broaden our knowledge. Thank you.

Now Recruiting For: Donor Communications Specialist New Cumberland PA


ABWEIn an economy where jobs are scarce, we are proud to be retained in assisting this wonderful non profit organization with filling this very import position. Please apply directly using the contact information below. Principles only, no agencies or recruiters thank you. ABWE is an equal opportunity employer.

The Association of Baptists for World Evangelism New Cumberland World Headquarters location is currently seeking a Donor Communications Specialist to join its Team. Reporting to the Director of Advancement this position is part of ABWE Foundation’s Advancement Team, supporting our efforts to raise over $45 million annually (primarily through missionaries), with a concentration on capital campaigns and donor relationship management designed to preserve the missionary support and to raise $2-3 million for projects and the home office. The Donor Communications Specialist is responsible for supporting the creation and distribution of regular and special communication pieces to our donor base, for both current and planned gift purposes.

Some of the responsibilities will include:

  • Work with Advancement Team to provide messaging (copy and content) for all elements of the Advancement Team’s strategy for cultivation of ABWE Foundation’s donor base for current and planned gifts, including appeal mailings, reporting, donor letters, email and web content, campaign pieces, etc.
  • Coordinate with Advancement Team and Donor Relationship Managers (DRMs), including the President, to develop tailored communication for specific donor types and prospects.
  • Serve as project manager, editor and principal writer for tailored communication pieces to major individual and Corporate/Foundation donors around the world.  Scope of work will include: providing regular, targeted program updates to high net worth donors; strategic communication pieces for unrestricted donors; and coordination of communication to specific donor groups.

Some of the qualifications of the position include:

  • Minimum of 3-5 years related work experience in development, customer relations, marketing or public relations.
  • Demonstrated outstanding writing and editing skills, preferably with experience writing to donor audiences at various giving  levels with an attuned skill for English-language grammar.
  • Experience and knowledge in writing and sending donor solicitations with various delivery methods and for maximum results and impact. Highly organized with excellent attention to detail and project management skills; ability to manage multiple projects simultaneously.
  • Strong computer skills (Microsoft Office Suite including Word, PowerPoint, Publisher and Excel); familiarity with other design and communication software is a plus and Experience with donor database management (Raiser’s Edge, DonorDirect or similar) and content management systems (Blackbaud NetCommmunity, Microsoft CRM or similar) or related
    software is a plus.

Education:  Minimum 4 year degree with emphasis in English, Communications, Journalism, Public Relations or Marketing preferred.

Christian Life:
As an employee of ABWE you are an important member of a Christian organization. All staff members are Christian missionaries and are required to participate in chapel services. Because of the nature of our ministry it is absolutely necessary that you possess and maintain a lifestyle that is above reproach.

Association of Baptists for World Evangelism
Attn: Mr. Neil Glotfelty
P.O. Box 8585
Harrisburg, PA 17105

eng@abwe.org

www.abwe.org

Please no phone calls!

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What Is a Mission?


Got Mission?Organizational Mission

All successful companies have a Mission.  Without a Mission, well, no one will know what it is they are doing and why. Another problem organizations have when absent a Mission is that their customers and vendors often end up confused, having mixed expectations.

I have worked for many companies in my time. Probably more than most, and I consider this to be a good thing. The reason I consider this a good thing is that the experiences that God has given me in these numerous and diverse organizations has made me a far more competent counselor to businesses across the marketplace than if I had occupied one narrow niche for most of my
career.

One common denominator I have identified is that the businesses that are successful all have an established Mission  for their organization, a Mission that is co-developed by all of their employees and is ingrained into the culture of the organization. In fact, in high-performing organizations, candidates are exposed to the company’s Mission before they’re even hired. Vendors know theMission and Customers are aware, as well.

When Vendors know the Mission and Customers understand it, that’s enormously positive, but the most powerful and impactful group are your Employees. In my wealth of experience, I have discovered an absolute truth by simply listening to employees for more than 20 years. Fully 99 percent of all employees who come to work every day, want nothing more than to do a good job; in fact, most want to exceed your expectations.  It really is the American way. Work hard, play hard and love your life. The problem, though, that many organizations suffer from is a lack of leadership to help steer the organization.

Specifically, they lack leadership in creating a Mission that employees own and strive to achieve.

What is a Mission?

Your Mission is simply what you do best — every day ­— and why.  Your Mission should reflect your customers’ needs. Having a Mission is the foundation of turning the dreams and potential of an organization into reality.  So, in a nutshell, your Mission
simply affirms why your organization exists!

So what does a Mission consist of? Well, it really is not rocket science. It is simply what your organization collectively — yes, I said collectively — not top down management, or board of directors to management — developed. It works like this:

  1. The senior management team develops a framework of what they believe the Mission is and should be.
  2. Line management then takes the draft document to the line supervision.
  3. Finally, employees and a good HR rep facilitate a roundtable session using the draft Mission as a guide.

You have a couple of reiterations, meetings back and forth, and then it’s time for “Congratulations!” because you now have a consensus on your Mission. Now, of course, when it is being facilitated, the facilitator must be skilled in getting everyone on board with the final product.

Key is letting your employees know that each one of them has an opportunity to challenge it, provide their personal input and suggest changes, but that, ultimately, when the majority of the employees and management agree to the final document, then it is up to all employees to respect it and support it.

Benefits of Creating or Revisiting Your Mission.

The benefit of creating a Mission or revisiting a current one is that it opens up the communication process inside of your organization.  An effective Mission is based on input and commitment from as many people within your organization as possible. A Mission statement should not be an autocratic version of Moses and the Tablets.  All of your employees must feel and understand your organization’s Mission.  Only then can they make the necessary personal commitment to its spirit.

Tips for great Missions:

  • Keep it short.
  • Describe WHY customers will buy from you.
  • Define your product or service clearly.
  • Identify WHO is your ideal customer.
  • Specify WHAT you offer your customer — benefits, services, advantages, etc.
  • Delineate what makes your product or service different from that of your competition.

Examples:

Google: “We organize the world‘s information and make it universally accessible and useful.”

Starbucks: “We inspire and nurture the human spirit — one person, one cup, and one neighborhood at a time.”

Share with us your experiences with your Company’s Mission.  How was it created?  Who was involved, how would you have changed the process?  Is the Mission applicable to you and your coworkers?  Share with us and help the community to learn and grow.

 

 

Joy-FM Morning JoyRide with Daniel, Candi, & Melody


Joy FM!Enjoy this Podcast as Mark is interviewed by Daniel Britt.

About Daniel Daniel Britt has been on the radio since the age of 14 and has a combined broadcasting experience of over 18 years. Daniel is the Operations Manager for the highly successful Gospel Music radio network, Joy FM, headquartered in Winston-Salem, NC.  He’s also the co-host of Dove-nominated radio show, “The Morning JoyRide with Daniel, Candi, & Melody.” Joy FM is the current Gospel Music Association’s Radio Station of the Year (2010).

About Mark  MIn HIS Name HR on iTunes!ark has had the pleasure of working for Christian owned organizations, he knows what works and does not work, and most importantly he sees the world through the employee perspective! He believes in treating everyone with dignity  and respect, because after all, your employees are part of your company family.

Mark believes that employees who work for an outwardly faith based Christian organization are committed at a different level than those in non-faith based organizations. He also explains that employees are more likely to go the extra mile, to trust their leadership, to deliver on their promises and be led by those who demonstrate Christ-like servant leadership, because  they can! Connect with Mark on LinkedIn by clicking here.

Morning Joyride! Joy FM

 

Click above to listen on your PC or click on the iTunes logo above to download to your iTunes account.

 

Good News for Tumultuous Times


Tree OF Life

In the past several years I have had the honor of meeting with Christian professionals across a variety of states. These professionals are potential clients, business partners, Christian professionals in the radio and television industry, Pastors of small congregations and Pastors of mega Churches as well. Although we are living in historical times in the areas of the housing crisis, stock market collapse, record deficit spending, global conflict, environmental disasters of record proportion and the moral decay of our society, (wow- I know a long list!) I feel a sense of calm from the Christian community.

What is really inspiring is when you take a step back from it, and really look at it with focus, the sense of calmness is causing non-Christians to take notice, because they are being attracted to what they see as the strengthening of our belief.

As I continue to meet with these optimistic business people, one trend tends to stick out. They all remain focused on remaining true to their faith but also feel a stronger obligation because of the current turmoil to express their appreciation of their relationship with God as their stronghold against earthly desires and struggles. We have had trials in our world before. We have experienced wars, the great depression, 9-11, etc. But we have never experienced the overwhelming amount of global change and conflict as we are today. It is so strong many have chosen to not watch the news any longer, many are just tuning out!

The most important thing I find Christian Business owners wanting to do is to be able to reach their people with the faith message without offending them.

I agree this is what many of us are called to do, we just don’t know how and are often scared and intimidated to do so. That is why I am here. I am here to help you through the process, to coach you to encourage you and to develop your Human Resource processes to help you be the company you want to be, not just for you but for God.

So yes dear readers, we are blessed to know the good news. We know God will protect us and carry us through anything that lies ahead. My challenge to you is to do so with encouragement to others around you. Too continue to shine the light for all to see, make people want to be like you for what you have in your heart. Bring more people to the party, many are looking for something because of these times, and you know what to give them.