Posts Tagged ‘Workplace’

Integrate - Performance Reviews for Success

Integrate — Performance Reviews for Success


Integrate — Performance Reviews for Success

Probably one of the least liked HR processes of all organizations is the dreaded performance review. However, it does not have to be that way. Performance reviews should be beneficial not only to the organization but to the employee.

Key components to a successful process include:

  • Built-in commitment to your MVV
  • Shared goals and objectives throughout the organization
  • Employee ownership of career and job performance
  • Simplistic but meaningful processes
  • Solid guidelines and commitment from senior leadership.

Commitment to your MVV

If you want your Team to fulfill your Company’s Mission reach your Vision and operate within your Values, you must build these into the Performance Review process. When you do, it shows the organization that leadership believes in the MVV so much that they have included it in the measurement of employment performance. Ensure your goals and objectives are aligned with your Missionand Vision; if they are not, you must question why they are in place. Most organizations that we support appreciate us walking them through a simple Strengths, Weaknesses, Opportunities, and Threats (SWOT) analysis to help develop goals for the organization. In the area of Values, always build your values and other important values into the behavior section of the Performance review form; we will discuss behaviors in more detail later in this chapter.

Shared goals and objectives

In high performing organizations, including those that I have worked for, have all had Performance Review processes that were aligned to shared goals and objectives through the organization. Typically the scenario worked like this: The CEO would develop four to six goals and objectives that would then be approved or renegotiated by the board of directors. Those goals would then cascade through the organization all the way down to, for example, the third-shift sanitation employee at the plant in Arkansas. The employees would then align what they needed to accomplish within their scope of authority against the goals of the person(s) above them.

The review process primarily focuses on annual goals, and very little on the mundane aspects of day to day work that is reflective of what the job description dictates. The daily work should be accomplished, and, if not, the employee should be managed through disciplinary procedures.

Employee ownership 

I have had the experience of employees approaching me earlier in my career at the end of the performance review cycle. Oftentimes, their approach was because they never had met with their managers even one time during the course of the performance cycle.

Make no mistake: they are at fault as much as their inept management. 

Employees must take ownership of their careers, their development and their performance. Those who do not simply will not survive in this economy. Part of ensuring that they take ownership, and helping them to understand it, is ensuring that the process is clearly defined, i.e., that the employee is obliged to prepare performance form materials, and be proactive in scheduling a performance review meeting with their manager if the manager is not. If the manager still fails to meet with them, the employee has an obligation to go to HR or, absent HR, the manager’s superior. Doing nothing should never be an option. 

Simplistic but meaningful processes

Twelve-page forms and manuals that exceed sixty pages will just not work. Ensure your process includes easily understood documentation, and a review form that does not exceed a good resume length, that is, two pages. Keep the form limited to four to six operational goals and three to five behavior-based goals.

Never have a process that is void of behavioral objectives. 

I have had the misfortune to work with several teams that insisted upon only production-related goals. They killed each other in the process to achieve them, and, when challenged,  they would always say that they were not being measured on niceness, but solely on how many widgets they made! Balance your performance scorecard, and you will have better results. 

Solid guidelines and commitment from senior leadership 

When we describe “solid” guidelines, we mean guidelines that are not created in a vacuum, by one person high on a mountaintop. Guidelines should be developed by a cross-functional group of employees from a variety of areas within the company. This brings a rich blend of thoughts and experiences to the table.

Regrettably, most of the HR people that I have worked with during my career are just not capable of coming up with such solid guidelines without assistance.

It is a sad statement to make regarding my profession, but I gave up defending much of the deficiencies I discovered years ago.

Senior Leadership must buy into the process and support it. If they don’t, it is doomed to certain failure.

Years ago, I worked for a company in which, no matter how hard the CEO worked on convincing the president of a particular division to manage the performance review process, this president would balk. The division president’s lack of commitment transcended the organization. The process became a joke, and no one nurtured it. I look back at the company now and wonder if things could have turned out differently. They have closed half of their plants, and shed several thousand employees. It might be a stretch to link this to lack of leadership in embracing a performance review process, but I do believe that, if Innovation was a top goal for the years heading into the downturn, that company could conceivably have created new products to sustain employment for those who were laid off. Sad, but this is often the case. Managers: stay committed!

What has been your experience with performance review systems? Do you like them? Hate them? We would like to know. Please leave us a few comments to broaden our knowledge. Thank you.

Integrate - Developing World Class Recruitment Strategies

Integrate-Developing World Class Recruitment Strategies


Perhaps one of the most difficult aspects of managing organizations is the act of recruitment. It is not necessarily difficult only on the candidates; it’s also difficult on organizations as well. Even though we are living in tumultuous business times, with real unemployment exceeding 10 percent in almost every city in our nation, recruitment is still a challenge for a variety of reasons, including but not limited to:

  • Lack of skilled candidates
  • Wounded and hurt applicants lacking trust of any organization
  • Having too many candidates to choose from makes it difficult to know where to      begin
  • Salary  expectation alignment; many candidates are accustomed to more

These are all hurdles to climb over but organizations that have a well thought out process and strategy will prevail in hiring the best candidates to accelerate the performance of the organization. The entire process of building a “Kingdom Minded” company revolves around including your Mission Vision and Values into every HR practice as practicable. The recruitment process is not excluded.

In developing your strategy, you should weave into the process several concepts that will help recruit the best candidates to help you manage within your Mission, reach your Vision, and operate within your Values. Your process should include:

  1. Networking your vacancies to trusted sources
  2. Using employee referral systems to increase your candidate pool
  3. Use consistent hiring methodology when recruiting candidates
  4. Always include your MVV in the recruitment process

Networking. Most companies, because of turnover within their HR department, or a lack of HR professionals within the company, do not have a formalized network to which they can announce vacancies. This is a concerning drawback to the process. Organizations should consistently mine for talent and the community should be aware of the organization and have a general idea of what they do and what their hiring patterns are. Organizations should spend time marketing themselves as a great place to work; this is also and effective form of marketing to potential customers. People want to buy products and services from organizations that treat their employees well. Start networking with churches, Christian colleges, LinkedIn groups, alumni associations, nonprofit executives, mission organizations, seminaries — the list could go on forever! The problem is that many organizations do not create such a network list. Network today; it will pay dividends in years to come.

Employee Referral Systems  Nine out of ten companies I meet with do not have either a formal or informal employee referral systems for candidates. If they do have one, it is stale and not yielding any results. This is unfortunate, because people want to work with people who match the company culture, and know how and want to get the job done. Reinvent this program or develop it if you don’t have one. The easiest way to do so is to bring together a cross section of employees for half an hour and ask them straight out: would you refer your friends to work here? If not, why not? And what do we need to do to make this an environment that you would want to refer them to? Delve into what the referral reward should be in the program. Some miserly HR folks suggest one to two hundred-dollar bonuses. Considering a Monster board ad is three hundred dollars, not to mention the hassle of screening 10 to 20 candidates to get to one good candidate, don’t you think this is a bit stingy? Reward your people!

Consistent Hiring Methodology  Lack of a consistent hiring methodology will get you burned. Getting an EEOC or Human Relations commission charge becomes not an “if” proposition but a “when.” But, stepping outside of the legal concerns, why not take the high road right off, and ensure your practice is beyond reproach? When recruiting, always have a job description, always have interview evaluation sheets, and always have decent but not copious notes of the candidate selection meeting when all interviewers give input. I have experienced some embarrassing situations at all levels of the organization where a document to support hiring or not hiring candidates didn’t even exist. If you don’t have this in place, make sure you keep your checkbook handy. You will need it.

And, finally, include your MVV in your process. You see, when candidates see this, they are intrigued, especially when the presenter presents it in a way that is exciting.

Candidates love to see people with passion and energy around their Mission.

Organizations have lost their mojo. Show candidates your passion! Most people want to work for a company that has direction. They are tired of the lack of leadership in government, in corporate America, and their local schools. The last thing they want to do is join a company that is weak and non-directional. Show them your passion through your MVV!

Explain to each candidate your Values, where they came from and why you have them. Let them know that you are a company founded on Christian principles. Most often the reaction I get from candidates when they hear this is, “Wow! Finally a place that might treat me with dignity and respect.”

Don’t worry about offending anyone. You are not pushing your values onto them; you are simply demonstrating what they are. I have had candidates say that they are not Christians, but that working for a company like ours would help them understand Christianity better. Exposing people to Christ — that is what we all desire.. That is the work God really wants us to focus on.

What have been your experiences in recruitment? Are there any best practices you would like to share? Be a difference maker today. Please contribute to the community and help others learn from your experiences. Thank you.

 

PodCast In HIS Name HR LLC Joy-FM Morning JoyRide

Joy-FM Morning JoyRide with Daniel, Candi, & Melody


Enjoy this Podcast as Mark is interviewed by Daniel Britt.

About Daniel Daniel Britt has been on the radio since the age of 14 and has a combined broadcasting experience of over 18 years. Daniel is the Operations Manager for the highly successful Gospel Music radio network, Joy FM, headquartered in Winston-Salem, NC.  He’s also the co-host of Dove-nominated radio show, “The Morning JoyRide with Daniel, Candi, & Melody.” Joy FM is the current Gospel Music Association’s Radio Station of the Year (2010).

About Mark 
Mark has had the pleasure of working for Christian owned organizations, he knows what works and does not work, and most importantly he sees the world through the employee perspective! He believes in treating everyone with dignity  and respect, because after all, your employees are part of your company family.

Mark believes that employees who work for an outwardly faith based Christian organization are committed at a different level than those in non-faith based organizations. He also explains that employees are more likely to go the extra mile, to trust their leadership, to deliver on their promises and be led by those who demonstrate Christ-like servant leadership, because  they can! Connect with Mark on LinkedIn by clicking here.

 

Click here to listen on your computer or click here for the download to your Apple iTunes PodCast.  

 

Organizational Vision In HIS Name HR LLC

Organizational Vision


High-performing organizations have a clearly defined Vision. This Vision helps guide all its employees and supervision to their desired destination and explains why. Companies who have a Vision have a workplace of direction, purpose and achievement. These companies have a Vision of where they want to be, and do the appropriate things to get there. All along the way, they have employees who are enthusiastically a part of it, eagerly supporting the Vision.

What Is an Organizational Vision?

A Vision that is optimal is one that has been created, or at least contributed to, by all employees of the organization. Like the Mission, the more buy-in the organization has, the greater the effectiveness of the Vision.   The Vision should be inspiring! It is where you want to be!   The Vision is what you seeing occurring as you deliver on your Mission. It is where you want your organization to be in five years. We define it as five years but you may prefer to extend that, or, if you are a start-up, you may want to start with a three-year Vision. We prefer five years, because that is a reasonable amount of time for most companies to get to the next step. The Vision must be realistically achievable. If you own a pizza shop, it would not be wise to say your Vision is to grow to a $2 billion-dollar market value. But, an achievable Vision might look like: “We will grow to be a regional choice by consumers by expanding to 10 locations.”

Reflect on the following questions as considerations for building your Vision:
1. How are the market and customer base changing in the next three to seven years?
2. How will that create opportunities for the organization?
3. How can we meet the gap between now and our Vision?
4. How will we surpass our competitors and seek greater market share?
5. What are we doing collectively to capitalize on the changes in business conditions and needs of the business?

Examples:

Amazon “Our vision is to be earth’s most customer-centric company; to build a place where people can come to find and discover anything they might want to buy online.”

Nike “To be the number one athletic company in the world.”

What is the difference between Mission and Vision?

 The most asked question to us surrounding Mission, Vision and Core Values is: what is the difference between a Mission and a Vision? Your Mission is what you do best every day. Your Vision is what the future looks like when you deliver on your Mission so exceedingly well.

High-performing Organizations

There is, unquestionably, a key to high-performing organizations.  That key is Vision — a Vision that ignites the employees of these organizations to achieve great things!

When I worked with the Gatorade Division of Quaker Oats, we smoked the competition.  Why?  We had Vision. And every employee who worked there bought into that Vision.  Powerade and All Sport didn’t have a chance.  In fact, where is All Sport today?  If Gatorade did not take them out completely, they certainly limited their capabilities!

The problem is not with workers in the U.S. What we have today is a problem with leadership — leadership that lacks the ability to create buy-in for excellence in Vision achievement.

If you are a leader, you must develop a Vision, and develop it with employee input.  If you are an employee, make sure you buy into your organization’s Vision. If it needs tweaking, ask to do so with respect. Your leadership will appreciate your interest!

Let’s all work together with our organizations to create Vision, to create a hope and future for everyone.

We Value your Comments.  Please share your thoughts on having an Organizational Vision. How do they fit into your workplace? Do you have a Vision where you work right now? Have you worked at a high-performing organization that did?

Give Your Employees a Hope and a Future

Give Your Employees a Hope and a Future


Jeremiah 29:11(NIV)  11 For I know the plans I have for you,” declares the LORD, “plans to prosper you and not to harm you,  plans to give you hope and a future.”

I believe that, in today’s tumultuous business times, we must remain diligent in our obligations as Christian business leaders.  Now, more than ever, Christian Business leaders must acknowledge that employees want, need and crave an environment in which they can be not only productive but trust that their leadership is attempting to provide them and their family stability, a “hope and a future.”

We must remain diligent in our obligations as Christian business leaders.

So what about you business leaders? What are you doing to demonstrate to your employees that you are setting the foundation for tomorrow’s growth?  Are you giving them hope and a future?  If you do this, if you honor your employees by properly managing your businesses and lighting a path to their future, you will be creating a “Kingdom Minded” company.”

What have you witnessed in your workplace that has created a culture of creativity, inclusiveness and productivity?  Please share your thoughts and help our community learn from your experiences.

Be Generous And Be Encouraged At Work

Be Generous And Be Encouraged At Work


Romans 12:8 (NIV)   “if it is to encourage, then give encouragement; if it is giving, then give generously; if it is to lead, do it diligently; if it is to show mercy, do it cheerfully. “

Over the past several weeks I have encountered a variety of circumstances where I have witnessed extreme cases of generosity.  These were situations where someone deliberately went out of their way to help a random “somebody” Not a friend or a relative but someone they did not know at all.  As Christian’s we are called to help each other, not just other Christians, for when we do so we shine the light of Christ though us.  Several years ago we had a campaign regarding “Others” at my church home.  I learned a lot through the sermon series but I also learned a lot from hearing from people who had been a recipient of someone who had  acted on their impulse to help another in need.  The impact that was made to the recipient was heart changing and ultimately affected the direction on that person’s life.

What impact have you made this week to another’s life?  What impact to the lives of your co-workers will you make this week?  If you commit to be an encouragement to your Team, if you make an impact to those you work with but not yet know you, you are helping to build a “Kingdom Minded” company.

Help our community of readers
What experiences have you had in the workplace that made it a better day for you and your coworkers?  What have you done to be an encouragement at work?

Post your comments below.