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Leveraging Gallup’s CliftonStrengths for Career Success


Career development should always be aligned with one’s potential.

Human potential is vast, but too many people unfortunately don’t know themselves well enough to tap into it. In fact, many of us navigate life without ever realizing our possibilities. To correct that, the first thing you need to do is understand your strengths.

Peter Guber, CEO of Mandalay Entertainment Group, said the success of someone’s career – regardless of profession or field – depends on their ability to lead, manage, and build good relationships with colleagues. His experience leading an entertainment industry business taught him that so much of our potential must be excavated and then honed to reach true career success.

That’s why it’s so important to know yourself well – no matter how long it takes to achieve that understanding. Once you know who you really are, you can recognize what you’re really capable of.

And then you can put it into practice and truly thrive.

How to Identify Your Potential for Career Development

It’s a fact that many students struggle with choosing a career path to pursue. And many adults already in the workplace still don’t know if they followed the right field.

That’s a shame for both the individuals involved and the companies they do or will work for. Feeling like a misfit can lead to extreme unhappiness and underperformance all around.

This is why the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI) is such an incredible tool. It’s designed to help you discover your personality and where that personality best fits within your chosen career field.

Less well-known but equally helpful is Gallup’s CliftonStrengths assessment. To quote their website:

“The 34 CliftonStrengths Themes Explain Your Talent DNA. When you take the CliftonStrengths Assessment, you uncover your unique combination of 34 CliftonStrengths themes.

“The themes, which sort into four domains… are a culmination of decades of research led by Don Clifton to study and categorize the talents of the world’s most successful people.

“Together, the themes explain a simple but profound element of human behavior: what’s right with people.”

Moreover, they give “you a way to describe what you naturally do best or what you might need help from others to accomplish.” And who couldn’t benefit from that?

Once completed, I’m confident this assessment can make your career journey much more informed and fruitful.

Here are just some of the themes you might identify with…

Domain: Influencing

Theme: Activator

  • You enjoy jumping right in and trying out different roles and jobs.
  • You seek leadership opportunities and positions where you’ll be rewarded for getting things moving.
  • You sometimes (or all the time) think about starting your own business.
  • You realize some people might feel threatened by your drive to make decisions and get things going.

Theme: Command

  • You’re willing to take on several potential roles or jobs, and you seek out chances to assume positions of leadership.
  • You seek out positions that offer room for advancement.
  • You take into consideration situations where quick decisions are required.
  • You seek careers in fields like law, commerce, politics, or theater, where you can use your persuasive skills.

Theme: Communication

  • You speak with people who could fill the roles you’re interested in, knowing their experiences will educate you.
  • You enjoy settings that provide you with regular social connections. Cooperative, engaging, and instructional environments are your ideal.
  • You prefer professions involving comedy, acting, motivational speaking, teaching, public relations, ministry, or training, where you can share your experiences.

Theme: Competition

  • You seek out chances to assume leadership roles.
  • You work on projects that will allow you to measure and compare your results.
  • You think about business, sales, law, politics, and sports.
  • You seek out positions that offer room for advancement.

Theme: Maximizer

  • You interview the “best of the best” to find out what they enjoy doing for a living.
  • You prefer settings that support “best practices” and allow you to collaborate with others to make the organization better every time.
  • You could consider positions that allow you to assist people in realizing their potential.

Theme: Self-Assurance

  • You’re skilled in many different things and like to try out potential positions or jobs. In fact, it’s crucial for you to choose what you enjoy.
  • You seek out settings that will challenge you while offering freedom to figure things out on your own terms.
  • You might want to think about pursuing a job in training, entertainment, or sales.

Theme: Significance

  • You want to leave a strong legacy behind.
  • You seek out settings where you can be acknowledged for your achievements.
  • Consider a profession where you can truly and enduringly improve the world.

Theme: Woo

  • You make sure to meet a diverse range of individuals working in various professions.
  • You seek out settings that appreciate your capacity to convince or sell – and where you can meet new people on a daily basis.
  • You could consider a job as a public relations specialist, sales representative, trainer, comedian, or lawyer.

Domain: Executing

Theme: Achiever

  • You have a relentless desire to achieve. You are only satisfied when you’re reaching or exceeding the goals in front of you.
  • You approach everyday as a new opportunity to make an impact, but you need to be cautions. Your drive can convince you to work nights, weekends, and long hours.
  • You have a strong work ethic, are able to lead by example when properly coached, and are a great asset to any organization seeking to achieve high performance.
  • You should seek careers that give you a lot of room to achieve the results you desire.

Theme: Arranger

  • Your default when problem solving is to seek all the pieces at the same time and arrange them into a logical sequence. You see patterns that others do not.
  • You desire a workplace that isn’t routine, where the daily aspects ebb and flow allowing you to use your arranging capabilities.
  • Seek careers where you can bring order out of chaos.
  • Pursue careers in employee relations, or human resources management, urban development, and leadership.

Theme: Belief

  • You hold deeply held ideals regarding how things should be in life, at work, and in the community.
  • Your ethical approach sometimes frustrate you when the world’s actions don’t align with it.
  • You could consider careers where your core values align with the organization in question, especially in pastoral care, certain medical fields, teaching, and counseling.

Theme: Consistency

  • You look for settings where rules, guidelines, policies, and procedures are well-established.
  • You seek out settings that are predictable and structured.
  • Law enforcement, human resources, risk management, safety compliance, and quality assurance positions might be right for you.

Theme: Deliberative

  • You research as much information as you can regarding potential roles and employment.
  • You prefer workplace settings where you can work alone to perform in-depth analyses, and you stay away from those that require too much socializing or human contact.
  • You consider jobs as judge, finance officer, or risk analyst to be ideal.

Theme: Discipline

  • You establish goals and outlines for your career-planning procedures.
  • You prefer structured settings where you can uphold order for both yourself and other people, and make use of your organizational skills.
  • Depending on your education, you might consider a job as an executive assistant, brain surgeon, tax specialist, or air traffic controller.

Theme: Focus

  • You gather as much information as you can about possible jobs or roles.
  • You look for environments where you can focus and concentrate without interruptions or the need to multitask.
  • You do best in structured environments that are predictable and detail-oriented.

Theme: Responsibility

  • You prefer settings where you can operate autonomously and eventually be given more authority.
  • You seek out locations where you can establish relationships of trust with other people.
  • You would likely do well in professions that place more emphasis on results than procedures, such as executive assistant, librarian, or law clerk.

Theme: Restorative

  • You’re intrigued by individuals known for pulling people out of difficult situations or jumping in to fix issues.
  • You appreciate situations where you’re required to identify issues and provide solutions.
  • Since you depend on your education and aptitude, you might be well-suited for careers as a TV producer, surgeon, or customer service representative.

Domain: Strategic Thinking

Theme: Analytical

  • You are smart, logical, thorough, good at thinking through issues, and good at handling numbers, figures, and charts.
  • You are objective and use data to search for trends, patterns, and interconnectedness.
  • Be cautious. Your greatest weaknesses can offend people since you have the propensity to be tough, never satisfied, and full of questions.
  • Choose a career that requires you to analyze data. Accounting, finance, marketing, and certain engineering fields should be explored.

Theme: Context

  • You look back at your past decisions to get an idea of what you enjoy and are highly skilled at.
  • You seek out settings where you can investigate the origins of things and gain a solid understanding of an organization or asset’s past.
  • Professions such as archaeologist, historian, curator, professor of humanities, or appraiser of antiques could easily appeal to you.

Theme: Futuristic

  • You desire a career path that enables you to help others glimpse the future and inspire them to bring it to pass.
  • You look for environments that encourage creativity and imagination.
  • Jobs in commercial art, architecture, design, or city planning appeal to you.

Theme: Ideation

  • As much as you can, you brainstorm and daydream about potential careers or professions.
  • You seek out settings that encourage experimentation, originality, and unconventional thinking.
  • You could easily consider a profession in advertising, market research, design, consulting, or strategic planning.

Theme: Input

  • You try to obtain as much input as you can regarding potential roles and employment.
  • You seek out settings where you will be exposed to large amounts of information and data.
  • Occupations that allow you to stay up to date with the latest developments in science and enable you to become a knowledgeable researcher and consumer are right up your alley.

Theme: Intellection

  • You stay abreast of change related to careers and career development.
  • You seek out settings where you can ponder and mull things through before acting.
  • You should consider a profession that provides you with intellectual challenges, where you can ask questions and exchange ideas. But stay away from groups that uphold the status quo.

Theme: Learner

  • You examine career inventories, read up on careers, and do further research on what you read.
  • You enjoy settings that promote lifelong learning and personal growth.
  • You are well-suited to jobs such as business trainer, instructor, or college lecturer.

Theme: Strategic          

  • You desire employment that enables you to create innovative initiatives and methods for addressing persistent issues.
  • You enjoy settings that are adaptable, foster creativity, and provide you with opportunities to view things holistically.
  • Professions in consulting, law, or psychology could be ideal for you.

Domain: Relationship Building

Theme: Adaptability

  • You have the ability to remain calm during stressful and ambiguous situations.
  • Routine roles that force you to plan and organize don’t appeal to you; you’re too action-oriented and independent-minded.
  • You enjoy constantly evolving demands and challenges. You could even say you thrive in chaos.
  • Careers that might suit you include human resources, emergency medical management, crisis management, manufacturing, and customer service.

Theme: Connectedness

  • You seek out NGOs that provide aid.
  • You prefer settings where you can engage with people and assist them in discovering meaning and purpose.
  • You recognize your own values and make sure the company you work for upholds them.
  • You think about carrying out a career that will allow you to live out your religious convictions.

Theme: Developer

  • You appreciate employment opportunities where you can help people in some capacity.
  • You seek out settings that emphasize communication, cooperation, and teamwork.
  • You like the sound of careers where you can assist others in improving their abilities such as life coach, counselor, or teacher.

Theme: Empathy

  • You look for employment in places where feelings are respected, not suppressed.
  • You desire environments that are upbeat and encouraging with lots of communication and teamwork.
  • You can consider pursuing professions such as education, human resources, counseling, or ministry.

Theme: Harmony

  • You’re a mediator at heart and seek to find middle ground with practical solutions that can drive everyone into agreement.
  • Your willingness to hear all perspectives helps when all sides of the issues need to be considered.
  • Ideal careers for you include arbitrator, counselor, diplomat, and ambassador.

Theme: Includer

  • You consider working with groups that are often set aside by others, such as those who are intellectually or physically challenged.
  • You seek out settings where you can play a welcoming role.
  • You enjoy the idea of being something like a special education teacher, social worker, therapist, youth worker, or HR representative.

Theme: Individualization

  • You appreciate settings where you can coach, train, and otherwise give others feedback.
  • You seek professions that allow you to work one-on-one with individuals.
  • Jobs such as HR specialist, business trainer, life coach, teacher, or counselor suit your personality.

Theme: Positivity

  • You choose work you’re passionate about that supports your hopeful view of the future.
  • You look for environments that are fun, fast-paced, and people-oriented, and where you can use your sense of humor.
  • You like the idea of careers as a coach, sales rep, teacher, or manager.

Theme: Relator

  • You discuss your perceptions with people in your trusted social group.
  • You enjoy settings that promote friendships and allow you to continue expanding your knowledge about others.
  • You could consider the role of manager, HR director, teacher, counselor, or school administrative professional.

How Well Do You Know Yourself?

Here’s an important question after scanning the CliftonStrengths’ list of themes and what they entail…

How well do you know yourself?

Most interviewers ask this question or something like it. So it’s an important consideration if you’re thinking about a career change. It might also come up during your annual employee review.

Or maybe you wonder about it on your own without any external prompting.

Regardless, this is the most crucial question you could possibly answer. It speaks to how much you know about what you want in life. And once you know that, it becomes so much easier to set goals in your career and elsewhere.

Just like that, you’re equipped to properly choose not only a fulfilling career but a fulfilling life.

So from now on, strive to identify the potential within you based on your individual strengths. In life, there is no such thing as too late to know yourself.

Set Your Bar High. What Is the Highest Goal You Want to Achieve?

In terms of career development, you need to have top-level goals or target priorities you want to achieve every year. Consider having at least three measurable goals and no more than five. At the end of December, you can determine your achievements, starting from the smallest to the most significant.

Learn from your achievements. Revisit what worked and what didn’t, and make sure you focus on repeatable behaviors that contributed to the goals you did attain.

Your targets must, of course, be in proportion to the potential you have. The higher the level of success desired, the more potential must be explored, including intrapersonal and interpersonal skills.

They also need to be reasonable. For example, if your current position is that of a supervisor and you want to advance from there, you can target becoming a manager in two years and then set your sights on the next advancement from there. Set a deadline for yourself and decide what steps you’ll take to achieve it.

Your yearly goals don’t have to involve accomplishing every intense dream you’ve ever pictured for yourself. Sometimes it’s much more intelligent to have a five-year or 10-year plan you build up to.

Just make sure to capitalize on and exercise your strengths to get there.

Speaking of plans, you should also consider making one to determine how to achieve each goal you have, yearly or otherwise. Another important aspect is determining likely challenges and preparing solutions to work past them.

Indeed, some goals are only achievable after you’ve overcome already existent problems.

Make Sure to Accept Help Along the Way!

Human potential is always aligned with career development. But you hardly have to work alone in order to realize yours. If you’re looking for guidance, there are seminars, workshops, and webinars out there specifically designed to optimize your potential and achieve your goals.

Or if you’re looking for more personalized guidance, In HIS Name HR helps organizations and individuals build high-performance human resource programs designed to get you where you need to be.

Concerned about the HR programs at your organization? The benefits of having a trusted partner to guide you and your team to excellence are invaluable. Contact us today. You—and your employees—will be glad you did.

Rise with us by implementing our high-performance remote human-resource programs to help find great people! E-mail us here.

Mark A. Griffin is president and founder of In HIS Name HR LLC. Connect with him on LinkedIn and Twitter

How to Be a Great Employee

How to Be a Great Employee


Did you know the average adult is awake 16 hours a day?

For those of us who don’t always work from home, that includes one hour to prepare for work, 30 minutes each way driving there and back, and at least eight hours at the office Monday-Friday.

Right there, we already have 10 out of our 16 allotted hours.

Now let’s contrast that with the time we invest at church. For some people, it’s just an hour a week. Quite the difference!

Now, admittedly, it is difficult and even impractical to try to even those amounts out too much. We do need to earn a living for ourselves and our families. So it makes sense that so much of our lives are invested in preparation for work and actually doing that work. But this hardly means we have to neglect out Christianity.

Far from it, in fact.

That’s why God’s presence in the workplace matters so much! This time-consuming setting offers great opportunities to encourage those who already know Christ and to witness to those who don’t.

Most of us probably don’t work for an organization that outwardly expresses our Christian beliefs. But we’re called to be ambassadors of Christ and reflect Him in our lives regardless, including when we’re on the job.

The Bible has a lot to say about the importance of work and how we should conduct ourselves in it. Two examples include (NIV):

Colossians 3:23 – “Whatever you do, work at it with all of your heart, as working for the Lord, not for men.”

Proverbs 16:3 – “Commit to the Lord whatever you do, and he will establish your plans.”

As such, let’s explore some of the important values that Christians should demonstrate in the workplace. The one I want to share today is integrity, with many more to come in future articles.

Proverbs 10:9 (NIV) reads:

Whoever walks in integrity walks securely, but whoever takes crooked paths will be found out.”

I’m sure we can all think of examples where people (maybe even us) didn’t show integrity in the workplace. These behaviors include the C.Y.A., or covering your you-know-what, method; throwing others under the bus; telling untruths; calling in “sick”; and having affairs with coworkers.

If it weren’t for the prevalence of such conduct, we wouldn’t need to have so many workplace policies on codes of conduct, harassment, social media activity, and the like.

But what exactly is integrity? It might be easy to spot when people lack it. But what does it mean when we have it?

Integrity denotes a deep commitment to do the right thing for the right reason, regardless of the circumstances – even when no one is watching, C.S. Lewis. It includes a sense of honesty, dependability, and consistency of character.

People with integrity adhere to moral company policies. They own up to their mistakes. They are honest and don’t tell untruths. They are trustworthy and dependable.

The word integrity evolved from the Latin adjective integer, meaning whole or complete. So it’s an inner sense and outer expression of “wholeness” deriving from qualities such as sincerity and consistent character.

Consider these questions to self-assess your own personal integrity:

  • Do you portray yourself differently depending on who you’re with?
  • Do you admit your mistakes?
  • Are you honest at all times?
  • Can others depend on you to do what you say you’ll do?

Our integrity is tested on a daily basis by a culture that’s normalized falsehood and dishonesty. This might involve cheating on an exam, fudging a business expense, downloading music illegally, taking office supplies from work, or telling little white lies.

They might seem small in the moment. Even necessary. But those sorts of actions can chip away at our souls little by little.

On the flipside, Scripture tells us many benefits of living with integrity:

  • It can give us promotions in the right way (Nehemiah 7).
  • It grants favor and honor, and opens the door for good things to come into our lives (Psalm 84:11).
  • It can help us find contentment (Proverbs 19:1).
  • It brings clarity and guidance to our lives (Proverbs 37:18).
  • It helps us be more like Jesus (Matthew 22:16).

King David also shed some light on integrity in Psalm 26:1-3 (NIV):

Vindicate me, O LORD, for I have led a blameless life; I have trusted in the LORD and have not faltered. Test me, LORD, and try me; examine my heart and my mind; for I have always been mindful of your unfailing love and have lived in reliance on your faithfulness.”

You can see here that the root of David’s integrity is his relationship with God. As it should be for us.

How Can You Be Sure That Your Integrity Guides Your Actions?

In order to claim integrity as part of your identity, you have to commit to acting on it. It’s not always easy, but it ends up being very worthwhile when you:

  • Keep your word.If you say you’re going to do something, then do it! If you say you’re going to be somewhere, then be there! We all know those people we can’t really count on.Don’t be one of those people! Otherwise, we’re bound to see Jeremiah 22:12 (NIV) applied to our lives: “Woe to him who builds his palace by unrighteousness, his upper rooms by injustice, making his own people work for nothing, not paying them for their labor.”
  • Tell the truth.Mark Twain said, “If you tell the truth, you don’t have to remember anything.” It’s easier and the right thing to do. Even little white lies eat away at your integrity.
  • Don’t gossip.Keep your confidence, and don’t talk about others behind their backs. Proverbs 11:13 (NIV) counsels us that, “A gossip can’t be trusted with a secret, but someone of integrity won’t violate confidence”
  • Work hard.Colossians 3:23 says, “Work willingly at whatever you do, as though you were working for the Lord rather than for people” (NIV). If you’re a believer, your real boss is God. So whether or not anybody else sees your work, God does.That’s why 2 Timothy 2:15 (NIV) reads, “Do your best to present yourself to God as one approved, a worker who does not need to be ashamed and who correctly handles the word of truth.”
  • Act consistently.A person of integrity doesn’t act one way in church, another way at work, and another way in social settings. In addition, he or she treats the janitor with the same level of respect as the CEO.God is never changing. He is faithful, trustworthy, true, and loyal. He can be counted on. And he wants us to follow his example, as shown in Proverbs 11:3 (NIV), which reads, “The integrity of the upright guides them, but the unfaithful are destroyed by their duplicity.”

In short, each one of us in the workplace has a responsibility to bring positivity and encouragement to the workplace. Let these tips and recommendations lift you to higher levels of performance.

For further actionable insights, reach out to In HIS Name HR here. We help organizations build high-performance human resource programs designed to build your workplace into the productive, engaging, effective, integrity-filled space you want it to be.

Contact us today! You, your students, faculty, and employees will be grateful you did.

Got Vision? Personal Visions and Goals

Got Vision? Personal Visions and Goals


Many people think about them, but very few actually have them. Personal Visions and Goals. Personal Visions are important to have. If you have one and focus on it often, you will ultimately steer your life toward obtaining it.

Think of your vision as your compass, your GPS, or — my personal favorite — a lighthouse at the beach, to lead you through the storms and past the rocky ocean waves you’ll encounter as you make your way toward your final destination.

In developing your vision, ask yourself:

What do I want?

It may sound like a simple enough question, but it’s one of the toughest to answer.

So, ask yourself again.

What do I really, really, truly want for myself?

If I could have the kind of life that would make my heart sing, what would it look like?

At this point, your heart may be beating a bit faster. Can you really have that kind of life?

Yes, I believe you can. I’ve done it and I’ve helped a lot of clients lead passionate and fulfilling lives. It starts by defining what that life could look like.

Now, let’s talk goals. You must establish personal goals in order to get to where you want to go, as outlined in your Vision. As an example, here are some parts of my vision and related goals this year:

  • Start a business that will grow itself, ultimately turning it into a non-profit;
  • Manage time more effectively to end my work day by 6PM in order to spend more time with my wife;
  • Finish and publish another book;
  • Expand my prayer life by surrounding myself with prayer experts;
  • Spend quality time with my wife by planning two weekends away with each other;
  • Attend at least one in-person seminar or conference to further hone my skills or personal growth;
  • Do a five-night backpacking trip;
  • Grow my social media presence by 20 percent;

Give yourself permission to dream about your ideal life, even if you spend just five to ten minutes a day, and consider the  following:

  1. What really is my relationship with God? Have I put my full trust in Him?
  2. If I could have more of something in my life, what would it be?
  1. What should I eliminate from my life for good?
  2. Which relationships do I need to nurture, or which ones should I release?
  3. What is my relationship to money?
  1. My secret passion or dream is…
  2. What am I most afraid of?
  3. What habits should I quit?
  4. What can I do to bring more joy into my daily life?
  5. What am I grateful for?

These questions are just a starting point, so take into account all major aspects of your life – friends and family (immediate and extended), church friends, charity work and, of course, fun and recreation. Also, examine thoughts centering on your daily career, activities, spending habits, your personal wellness and fitness, spirituality, and, of course, your spouse.

Got Vision?  We would love to know if you have walked through this process before.  What was the outcome?  Be a difference maker today and inspire a reader by leaving us comments.   Have a great week.

 

Kingdom minded organization HR

How to Build “Kingdom-Minded” Organizations – Special Anniversary Pricing


Your organization faces novel challenges stemming from the COVID-19 pandemic. The coronavirus has created turmoil for you and your most important resource, your employees. We want to help you. Now is the time to reset the old ways, decide how to restart, and move forward.

The first step is to reflect on why you exist as organization, what you stand for, and how you can best work with your employees to ensure mutual prosperity while advancing the ministries you support, the communities in which you live, and the families of the employees who make up your organization. Ensuring a workplace that promotes Christian values contributes to all of that.

This month celebrates the 8-year publication anniversary of the book How To Build “Kingdom-Minded” Organizations. In it, author, speaker and noted HR consultant Mark A. Griffin illustrates how leaders can build values-led organizations and maintain Christian workplace ethics designed to help weather difficult economic times.

Mark doesn’t just explain why establishing Christian values in the workplace is important—he shows you how to make it happen. Using a model he developed through years of organizational development experiences, Mark demonstrates how to weave your organization’s mission, vision and values into all of your HR practices. This ensures your Christ-centered culture is integrated into your organization and maintained, now and in the future.

Take advantage of this special anniversary discount to benefit from Mark’s guidance on how you might best build successful, lasting “Kingdom-minded” organizations in today’s politically correct business world. Mark will inspire you to be bold and brave in your faith, and ensure that Christ is in your workplace.

 

 

Special for the month of May 2020

1/2 off Retail Price

Kindle $4.49

Softcover $8.99

 

Buy it Now HR Mastery Toolkit

 

About the Author 

Mark A. Griffin is the founder and chief consultant of In HIS Name HR LLC, a human resources outsourcing and career coaching firm created to help companies pilot the complex issues of managing HR.

As a human resource professional with 20-plus years of experience in both private and public companies (e.g., Quaker Oats, Kodak, Merck), Mark is passionate about building high-performance workplaces that utilize best practices and lead with strong values.

A veteran of the United States Air Force, Mark earned his MBA while interning for Congressmen Kanjorski as a military liaison during the first Gulf War. Mark has completed several executive education programs at the University of Michigan and is a certified practitioner of the Myers–Briggs Type Indicator, MBTI®. He has also coached leaders on “Business as Mission” onsite in Eastern Europe, India, Haiti and the Dominican Republic.

Speaker, noted HR consultant, and author of How to Build “Kingdom-Minded” Organizations and College to Career: The Student Guide to Career and Life Navigation, Mark A. Griffin demonstrates to Christian leaders how to build values-led organizations, particularly during difficult economic times.

Contact: Mark A. Griffin, In HIS Name HR LLC, 717-572-2183, MGriffin@InHISNameHR.com

 

Special Anniversary Pricing How To Build “ Kingdom-Minded” Organizations


Special for the month of May 2016

Kindle pricing $2.99 and half off Softcover $5.49

This month we are celebrating our 4 year publication anniversary.   In How To Build “ Kingdom-Minded” Organizations, author, speaker and accomplished HR consultant Mark A. Griffin gives Christian leaders encouragement in building values-led organizations during these difficult economic times.

Most importunately Mark shows you how to make it happen. Using a model he developed through years of organizational development experiences, Mark demonstrates how to integrate your Mission, Vision and Values into all of your HR practices. This ensures your Christ centered culture is integrated into your organization and maintained into the future.

 
With over 20 years of Human Resources experience at both fortune (Kodak, Quaker Oats Company, and Merck Pharmaceutical) as well as small and mid-sized companies, Mark has seen it all. Enjoy reading Mark’s thoughts on how you might best build “Kingdom Minded” Organizations in today’s “politically correct” business world.

Let Mark inspire you to be bold and brave in your faith, by ensuring Christ is in your workplace.

 

Buy it Now HR Mastery Toolkit

 

About The Author 

Mark A. Griffin is the founder and chief consultant of In HIS Name HR LLC, a human resources outsourcing and career coaching firm created to help companies pilot the complex issues of managing HR.

As a human resources professional with 20-plus years of experience in both public (Quaker Oats Company, Kodak Inc., Merck Inc.) and private companies (Woolrich, Conestoga Wood Specialties, Valco Companies Inc.), Mark is passionate about building high performance workplaces through utilizing best practices while leading companies with strong values.

While serving in the United States Air Force, Mark received his Bachelor of Science degree in Human Resources Administration from Saint Leo University. He earned his MBA from Bloomsburg University while interning for Congressmen Kanjorski as a Military Liaison during the first Gulf War. Mark has completed several executive education programs at the University of Michigan and is a certified practitioner of the Myers Briggs Type Instrument MBTI®.

Mark and his wife, Gail, have two adult children, and will celebrate their 30th wedding anniversary June 2016. They attend LCBC Church. Mark has traveled the world coaching leaders on “Business as Mission” in Eastern Europe, India,  Haiti and the Dominican Republic.

Mark is an author of How to Build “Kingdom-Minded” Organizations and College to Career: The Student Guide to Career and Life Navigation.

Speaker and accomplished HR consultant, Mark A. Griffin gives Christian leaders encouragement in building values-led organizations during these difficult economic times.

Contact: Mark A. Griffin, In HIS Name HR LLC, 717-572-2183, MGriffin@InHISNameHR.com

 

 

Be a Light unto Your Workplace

Be a Light unto Your Workplace


Matthew 9: 35–38

35 Jesus went through all the towns and villages,  teaching in their synagogues, proclaiming the good news of the kingdom and  healing every disease and sickness. 36 When he saw the crowds, he  had compassion on them, because they were harassed and helpless, like sheep without a shepherd. 37 Then he said to his disciples, “The harvest  is plentiful but the workers are few. 38 Ask the Lord of the  harvest, therefore, to send out workers into his harvest field.”

The Apostles spent their days in their workplaces.

So do we.

In today’s business world, the workers are few.  However, are you aware that you are a worker? As Christian Leaders, we are called to bring others to the Lord’s harvest.  Our fields, as leaders, are in fact the  workplace! We spend countless hours leading our people in the organizations we  manage.  During those hours, we should be an example of God’s love to our customers, coworkers, vendors and the people we  lead.  Do we take this responsibility seriously?  Do our actions reflect our hearts?  Do they reflect Christ? Do  you go out of your way to humbly lead your people to Christ? So, Christian Business Leaders, if you are a light to your workplace, if you can truly agree that you are a beacon to all, you are  then a reflection of Christ; you are part of building a “Kingdom Minded”  company.”

How do you shine a light to your employees? How do you let your customers and vendors know your faith?  Sometimes the simplistic ways are the most impactful. Let us know. We love to learn best practices.

 

Finding Diamonds In The Rough In HIS Name HR LLC

Finding Diamonds in the Rough


This Post From Guest Blogger Buzz Rooney

I was blessed to spend the early part of my career as a staffing manager for light industrial jobs. One of the most valuable lessons I learned was not to judge people’s work ethic or abilities solely on their aptitude in filling out a job application or writing a resume. Some of the hardest working, most loyal and dedicated employees had the most difficult time writing an explanation of their previous job experience.

Resume writing and everything else that goes along with the job search is stressful. Most people are not taught how to track their performance and work product to build a comprehensive professional profile.  Admittedly, my own resume was a hot mess until I reached out to a professional friend to give it a much needed makeover! Struggle in this area is commonplace. One would think this would make recruiters and hiring managers less critical of applications and resumes.

However, when I made the switch to more traditional HR, I found the exact opposite to be the custom. Candidates were being discarded for minor errors and/or choosing unsophisticated descriptors.

John 7:24 (NLT) – “Look beneath the surface so you can judge correctly”.
In screening and reviewing resumes to find suitable candidates for open positions, look for 3 things:

Experience. Does the person’s work history establish practice in the same or similar type of role? Has the person ever worked in the same or similar industry? Did the person perform the same or similar tasks in a past position? (Romans 2:6 [NLT] – “He will judge everyone according to what they have done”)

Education. Has the person taken courses that would prepare him/her for this position? What kind of coursework has he/she completed that would teach the problem-solving skills necessary for success at this job? (Proverbs 18:15 [NKJ] – “The heart of the prudent acquires knowledge, and the ear of the wise seeks knowledge”)

Enthusiasm. Does the tone of the resume display a positive attitude about work? Are there accomplishments which demonstrate excellence? Is there a pattern of progressive responsibility in the work that shows ambition? Do the projects outline the ability to both lead and provide support within a team? (Colossians 3:23 [NLT] – “Work willingly at whatever you do, as though you were working for the Lord rather than for people”)

Do not be so concerned with superfluous things like formatting, stylized punctuation or accidentally typing “manger” instead of “manager.” Focusing heavily on unessential things will cause us to miss those diamonds in the rough.

We all make errors, both before and during our employment journeys. We have to use caution in judging others too harshly – especially knowing our own skills, abilities and practices are not necessarily at the best level they can be (Matthew 7).

Instead, by focusing on identifying the potential talent in the resumes we receive, we can rest assured we will yield good candidates and build a strong team of staff members to complete the work.

Buzz Rooney is a practicing HR Professional with over a decade of experience in the production, manufacturing and retail industries. She has Bachelor’s Degree in Communication Studies with a focus on Organizational Communication and Leadership as well as a Master’s Degree in Human Resources Management. Buzz is also a blogger and part-time HR consultant.

New Book Provides Christian Inspiration for Business Leaders and Professionals


Kingdom-Minded Organizations

New Book Provides Christian Inspiration for Business Leaders and Professionals

Contact: Mark A. Griffin, In HIS Name HR LLC, 717-572-2183, MGriffin@InHISNameHR.com

LANCASTER, Penn., May 7, 2012 /Christian Newswire/ — HR consultant and career coach Mark A. Griffin has worked for more than 20 years in a corporate world where the bottom line is king and often anything goes in the pursuit of profit.

Mark believes, however, that there is another, better way to do business and in his latest book, How To Build “Kingdom-Minded” Organizations, he provides inspiration for Christian business leaders who want to create a values-led organization that brings Christ into the workplace.

In the last decade, the global corporate world has endured some of the toughest economic times since the Great Depression with business leaders and employees alike enduring increasing pressure s

imply to survive. Too often the workplace has become somewhere devoid of hope and of genuine purpose and yet the workplace is still where many of us spend the majority of our time.

Mark’s human resources career over two decades in the marketplace has encompassed both Fortune 500 companies, such as Kodak, Quaker Oats and Merck, and small and mid-sized companies and his knowledge and expertise of the corporate world is unrivaled.

It’s his experience of a business world that has lost its way and is out of touch with its responsibilities to both workforce and clientele that has led Mark in a different direction, one informed and inspired by his own strong Christian faith.

Mark’s remarkable book will empower business leaders to be bold and brave in bringing their own faith into their workplace. He understands that it takes great courage to step away from the normal business practices that continue to dominate America’s corporate world but his book provides simple and effective tools that will integrate the teachings of Christ into an organization.

Through his own organization, In HIS Name HR LLC, Mark is on a mission to provide world-class business consulting that allows clients to be prosperous but also to be “Kingdom-Minded” by instilling a Christian ethos and establishing goals that reflect that ethos.

How To Build “Kingdom-Minded” Organizations provides the starting point for those who want to create, build and develop their own values-led business that is profitable and is also a stable, positive environment in which employee wellbeing is enhanced, thus improving quality and increasing productivity.

Radical, inspirational and affirmative — Mark A. Griffin’s template for “Kingdom-Minded” businesses is an idea whose time has come.

How To Build “Kingdom-Minded” Organizations is now available at Amazon.com. Purchase at www.kingdommindedorganizations.com

Learn more about Mark A. Griffin and his quest to help the Christian owned company live their faith by visiting him at www.InHISNameHR.com, or contact him on www.Twitter.com/InHISNameHR.

Radio Series Week 12 How To Develop Company Culture

Week 12- How best to develop and manage your Company Culture


Final Podcast in this series!  Radio Series Week 12-

Tune in and enjoy listening to Mark A. Griffin, Chief Consultant, inspire you as he dialogues with host Dee Kovach on, How best to develop and manage your Company Culture. Let Mark inspire you to be bold in your faith as you learn to navigate the complexities of faith in the workplace. Be encouraged as you learn how to develop a high performing organization through your HR practices.

“Praise HIS Name” in partnership with “In HIS Name HR LLC” announce the launch of a twelve week radio series highlighting faith in the Christian owned workplace. Tune in and enjoy listening to Mark A. Griffin, Chief Consultant, inspire you as he dialogues with host Dee Kovach, exploring twelve inspiring weeks of Christian Business topics.

Listen or download on iTunes here: Click

 

 

Because Outlook Told Me So

Because Outlook Told Me So


This Post From Guest Blogger Buzz Rooney

I have always worked in small HR departments where I am one of 2-3 staff members, wearing multiple hats and juggling competing priorities all day, every day. I am generally orderly and mindful in my work and in my record-keeping. That is an essential skill in this profession where historical data can be called upon at any time for analytics or legal scrutiny. When my staff asks me how I keep it all together and remember to start, track and finish all these tasks, I jokingly say “I don’t remember anything. I just do what the Outlook reminders tell me to do.”

Still, there are times when I sit at my desk and look at the piles, issues and emails that all need to be addressed and I have no idea where to start or how to get it all done! When that happens, I take a deep breath, pull out a piece of paper and make a list.

Habakkuk 2:2-3 (NKJV) – “Write the vision and make it plain on tablets, that he may run who reads it. For the vision is yet for an appointed time”

  • Written plans set priorities and give focus. Once you have dumped your brain and written down everything, you can organize the list according to what is most urgent and important. You may be able to get help or delegate tasks. You may find that there are items that can be postponed or removed altogether. You may find tasks that can be merged together. However, when thoughts are just rolling around in your mind and piles of work are all around, you have no idea of any of these things! Deadlines get missed and important items get forgotten. This is not what God would have for us. God wants us to be productive and meet needs through our work (Titus 3:14). Being deliberate and logical in our work can help us achieve this.
  • Written plans make it easier to measure effectiveness. When you maintain a list of to-do items or another type of action plan, it is easy to see not only what needs doing but also what has been done. There is a great feeling that comes from conquering tasks on your list (Proverbs 13:9). It gives us a sense of accomplishment that can help keep us motivated to continue working hard in pursuit of our goals (Galatians 6:9).

There are two clear pitfalls to avoid in when preparing the lists and plans for our work.

  • Complicated, confusing objectives. The Scripture calls for us to make things “plain” so our plan is easy to follow. Keep things clear and concise.
  • Lengthy, lofty outline. The Scripture calls for us to create plans for “an appointed time.” This is why long lists without clear time limits are ineffective. Keep things specific and finite.
    • Whether it is a strategic plan for the organization, a meeting agenda or to-do reminders for the day – the ability to create and follow a written plan is critical to consistent performance and long-term achievement. God wants us to be effective in our work. He also wants us to be organized and methodical. And when we look to Him for strength and guidance through prayer and meditation, we can rest assured that He will direct and keep us on a path to success (Proverbs 3:1-8).

Buzz Rooney is a practicing HR Professional with over a decade of experience in the production, manufacturing and retail industries. She has Bachelor’s Degree in Communication Studies with a focus on Organizational Communication and Leadership as well as a Master’s Degree in Human Resources Management.