Join us in Garden Grove, California November 6 – 8, 2019


Sexual Harassment and Your Responsibilities Under the Law

You can’t open a news website without seeing another #MeToo circumstance being reported. As a result, many organizations have a “zero tolerance” policy for sexual harassment in the workplace, but what does that really mean to you, as a leader? Or you, as an employee? What is sexual harassment? In this interactive presentation, you’ll learn:

  • What sexual harassment is—including the verbal, visual, and physical conduct that could be considered or perceived as harassment
  • What your rights and obligations are under the law
  • What you can do as an employee to support a harassment-free work environment
  • What you should do as a leader to help provide a harassment-free workplace
  • What to do if you feel you may have been the subject of sexual harassment
  • Steps your organization can take to better your work environment

Sexual harassment is unacceptable in any workplace. It simply should never be tolerated. Come learn how you can help free your workplace of harassment and make it one where all employees will grow and prosper.

For more information about the TRACS conference click here.

About The Speaker

Mark is an accomplished HR expert with a fresh perspective. He believes in challenging people to think differently when presented with obstacles in any situation. His passions are inspiring, motivating, and helping others. Peers describe Mark as creative, proactive, determined, and eager to learn. Just a few of Mark’s professional skills include organizing, presenting, and problem solving.

Mr. Griffin received his Bachelor of Science degree in Human Resources Administration from Saint Leo University. He earned his MBA from Bloomsburg University while interning for Congressmen Kanjorski as a military liaison during the first Gulf War. Mark has completed several executive education programs at the University of Michigan.

Prior to leading In HIS Name HR, Mark worked for Quaker Oats Company, Kodak Inc., and Merck Inc., and private companies Woolrich, Conestoga Wood Specialties, and Valco Companies Inc.

In addition to helping people professionally, Mark also believes in helping people personally through volunteer work. Mark has coached leaders on “Business as a Mission,” traveling to Eastern Europe, India, Haiti, Honduras, Nicaragua, and the Dominican Republic.

People Join Organizations- They Leave Managers


Do you wonder why good employees leave your organization?

Dr. John C. Maxwell gives his opinion about this in his book Leadership Gold: “People quit people, not companies.”.

My conversation with a young professional twenty-something started simply enough.

“How’s the new job going?”

My eyes widened as I listened to this passionate young lady talk for more than half an hour about how she and many of her colleagues want so much to impact the organization they work for, but how management there is weak and how the leadership completely lacks direction. People are not held accountable, she explained. There is no collective vision as a team and new folks are not brought on board with any sense of excitement or motivation.

I nodded. I knew exactly what she was talking about. I’d seen it for myself in many instances. Eliminating the kind of frustration she was feeling is one of my greatest motivators in doing what I do, helping leaders move forward and build high-performance organizations.

So, what’s going to happen? It wasn’t hard to figure out. She made it quite clear—she won’t put up with it for much longer. Instead, she would become one of the many sharp, smart people I’ve encountered who choose to exercise their skills in more fertile fields instead of enduring such barren conditions. They go on to positively fertilize other organizations, contributing to a sustainable harvest by taking them to greater levels of efficiency and performance.

Meanwhile, those organizations with chronically weak and mediocre managers fade, eventually cease to operate, and die. Maybe not right away—it may take time, but ultimately they fail to survive.

If your organization has great leadership, is on the ball, and inspires and motivates all of its employees, including its young All-Stars, then you are indeed building a high-performance organization.

___________

In His Name HR helps organizations build high performance Human Resources programs. Visit them at In HIS Name HR or e-mail them here.

Mark A. Griffin is the founder and chief consultant of In His Name HR LLC. Connect with him on LinkedIn or Twitter.

 

In HIS Name HR, in conjunction with ABHE

2020 ABHE Annual Meeting ~ Rosen Plaza Hotel, Orlando, Florida


The Association for Biblical Higher Education (ABHE) Annual Meeting

February 12–14, 2020 | Rosen Plaza Hotel, Orlando, Florida

Read The Press Release Here 

In HIS Name HR, in conjunction with ABHE, is excited to announce the 2020 Annual Meeting presentation topics.

Presentation One

How to Develop a More Effective Employee Search Process

It’s no secret that your higher education institution wants to succeed. It should come as no surprise that your employees also want to succeed! Naturally, there’s often a strong, positive relationship between the two—when employees succeed, so do the institutions they serve.

A key question: How can organizations most effectively find, train, motivate, and encourage employees’ success?

Primary Topics Covered

  • Marketing your institution in today’s difficult labor market
  • What makes employers attractive?
  • Where do institutions find the best employees?
  • What are the three most important steps of an effective hiring process?

This presentation helps prepare not only those in HR but also anyone who might have an effect on hiring in your organization. The presentation is highly interactive (including table exercises) and gives participants the opportunity to collaborate with other organizations and professionals.

Presentation Two

The Art of Employee Evaluation and Transition/Separation

Here, we examine the concept of a high-performance review process, and how your institution can optimize performance levels through an effective and enjoyable employee review process—a process that your employees will enthusiastically embrace and enjoy instead of dread.

We also discuss performance improvement plans that transition underperforming employees either to more suitable roles or out of the organization, and how to separate employees with grace.

Primary Topics Covered

  • Taking steps – simple, impactful, and timely – to make the process gracefully effective
  • Executing a comprehensive communication plan to all employees
  • Avoiding the common pitfalls in other organizations
  • Setting expectations
  • Employee policy manuals
  • Codes of conduct
  • Counseling and disciplinary procedures
  • Terminations
  • Labor law overview

The training is highly interactive (including table exercises) and gives participants the opportunity to collaborate with other organizations and professionals.

Learn More Here 

 

Visit us- Booth 119 – ABHE Annual Meeting!

About The Speaker

Mark is an accomplished HR expert with a fresh perspective. He believes in challenging people to think differently when presented with obstacles in any situation. His passions are inspiring, motivating, and helping others. Peers describe Mark as creative, proactive, determined, and eager to learn. Just a few of Mark’s professional skills include organizing, presenting, and problem solving.

Mr. Griffin received his Bachelor of Science degree in Human Resources Administration from Saint Leo University. He earned his MBA from Bloomsburg University while interning for Congressmen Kanjorski as a military liaison during the first Gulf War. Mark has completed several executive education programs at the University of Michigan.

Prior to leading In HIS Name HR, Mark worked for Quaker Oats Company, Kodak Inc., and Merck Inc., and private companies Woolrich, Conestoga Wood Specialties, and Valco Companies Inc.

In addition to helping people professionally, Mark also believes in helping people personally through volunteer work. Mark has coached leaders on “Business as a Mission,” traveling to Eastern Europe, India, Haiti, Honduras, Nicaragua, and the Dominican Republic.

 

Are You Having an Organizational Identity Crisis?

Are You Having an Organizational Identity Crisis?


If your organization is having an identity crisis.  You may be the last to know. The clues aren’t usually obvious, but you may sense something is wrong.

Do you spot any of these patterns emerging?

  • More and more employees are leaving
  • Quality and/or performance is trending downward
  • Your organization is missing deadlines
  • Your clients or customers are complaining more
  • It’s getting harder and harder to find good talent

These issues are not random blips on the landscape. They reveal deeper problems, those below the surface. Greater attention to structure and organization may be needed, but there is a core issue at stake: Organizational Identity.

An identity crisis may happen for a number of reasons. Some reasons are inevitable. Some are regrettable. But, many times an identity crisis starts from what are, initially, positive changes. What is positive at first, like growth or increased capabilities, can morph into quagmire without attention. This drag causes confusion and does not just hinder your workers but will inevitably affect your customers and outside contacts, too.

An identity crisis will likely coincide with these circumstances:

  • A change in key management, ownership, or structure
  • A new technology replacing an old way of doing things
  • Expansion into a new territory or demographic
  • Offering new services
  • Expansion and increased public visibility
  • New or changing partnerships, associations, or clients

Organizations, if they last long enough, experience seasons where renovating identity is crucial. This is a good thing. What your organization stands for or why it exists may seem obvious to you, but it needs routine upkeep to ensure everyone shares a cohesive vision. Creating and cementing your organization’s Mission, Vision, and Values are essential to new and continued success.

Organizational Identity answers the questions:

  • Who are we?
  • Why do we exist? 
  • How do we share that vision beyond ourselves?

Core values and identity should be found together—in a partnership with owners and employees. It should be built from the ground up to forge something solid and genuine. Identity can never be reduced to platitudes or window dressing. It shouldn’t stop at a new logo and updated policies. It must be the foundational way that your group functions, together and with the outside world

Organizations like charity: Water, Starbucks, and The Coca-Cola Company, for example, have all crystallized their organizational identity for us. But, more important, they have all reinvented or re-clarified themselves as times have changed and found continued success. With some effort or outside expertise, you can usher in higher performance for your organization, too.

So, what problems have you seen that were evident of an identity crisis?  Help us and our community of readers to learn from your experiences

 

Mark Griffin is founder and Chief Consultant at In His Name HR LLC. He has over 20 years of HR experience.  Follow In HIS Name HR on FacebookTwitter and LinkedIn.

10 Great Reasons For Performance Management (Annual Reviews)


Most employees loath them; many managers avoid them. High Performance Organizations have them, and they do what they’re designed to do—evaluate precisely the performance of each employee.

Feel like you don’t need them? Here are 10 great reasons that should change your mind.

  1. Aligning performance to goals and objectives

Most organization employees I meet with say they have no idea what the yearly top two or three goals are for their organization.  A great performance program sets these goals as their starting point. Ninety-nine percent of employees in this country want to do well at work, but we lack leaders who know how to align their desire to achieve to the organizational goals.

  1. Providing a basis for promotion/transfer/termination

Many organizations are not transparent concerning how to be promoted.  A performance review process more readily identifies those employees who deserve promotion and those who require lateral shift (transfer) or need to enter into a remedial program. This system also aids career planning.

  1. Enhancing employees’ effectiveness

Most people really do want to be better at their jobs! Helping employees to identify their strengths and weaknesses and informing them of the organization’s expectations concerning their performance helps them to better understand the role they play and increases work efficiency. Feedback reinforces good performance and discourages poor performance.

  1. Aiding in designing training and development programs

Instead of creating “programs of the month,” you can use performance review data to more accurately ascertain training needs and identify skills that need to be developed in order to tailor-make the most effective training and development programs.

  1. Building teams

Counseling employees corrects misconceptions, which might result in work alienation. Performance management also helps employees to internalize the norms and values of the organization. (I have met leaders who have not talked to their employees about their performance since 2012!)

  1. Removing discontent

Performance management puts all employees on the same measuring tape. Identifying and removing factors responsible for worker discontent motivates them to perform better at work. Performance management helps to create a positive and healthy work environment in the organization.

  1. Developing interpersonal relationships

Relations between superiors and subordinates can be improved through the realization that there exists a mutual dependence that leads to better performance and success. By facilitating employees to perform introspection, self-evaluation and goal setting, their behavior can be modified. Better interpersonal relationships lead to team building.

  1. Aiding wage administration

Performance management can help to develop fair and more equitable base lines for reward allocation, wage fixation, raises, incentives, etc.

  1. Exercising control

A performance review process provides a means to exercise control of projects focused on, and helps keep employees aligned to the agreed upon annual goals and objectives.

  1. Improving communication

Performance management serves as a mechanism for improved communication between superiors and subordinates.  Often times managers shy away from counseling employees.  When the right system is in place, especially is it is employee driven, it forces discussions on a regular basis.

In closing, my experiences lead me to support employee driven programs.  Programs that rely on managers and leaders have a higher propensity for failure.  Simple yet meaningful programs that include goals, objectives, behaviors, an employee development component and stretch assignments meet what most employees’ desire.

How important are employee performance reviews in your organization?  Leave your comments below! 

___________

 

In His Name HR helps organizations build high performance Human Resources programs. Visit them at In HIS Name HR or e-mail them here.

Mark A. Griffin is the founder and chief consultant of In His Name HR LLC. Connect with him on LinkedIn or Twitter.

The Crucial Upside of Workplace Friction In HIS Name HR LLC

The Crucial Upside of Workplace Friction


Every workplace has friction—that’s the simple truth. Anytime you have a few people working together on something, differences surface that create drag. We shouldn’t be surprised when conflict or tensions arise. Instead, we should be prepared and have some tactics on hand to facilitate a cooperative working environment and healthier relationships. Friction has a bona fide upside.

In my decades of work in the field of Human Resources, I’ve learned that 3 major things have the potential to create workplace conflicts:

  • Inadequate communication
  • Lack of emotional control
  • Indefinite goals and boundaries

Here’s an example of all three creating a common situation of friction:

Project X must be finished in two months. The lower level manager fails to set legible parameters on a project when expectations and roles are not defined for the work. As the manager delegates the project, too much is left to speculation. Co-workers attempt to complete the work, but soon run into interpersonal problems as different ideas emerge. Frustration increases, tempers flare, morale sinks, and passive aggressive sabotage and gossip start. In other words, gridlock. A few team members inform the manager; however, by then, emotion is driving the situation. Decision-making is maligned and communication continues to falter. The project is tanking.

What to do?

A lot of repair work is needed to get things back on track and keep the project moving forward. First—and this is important—ditch email as a resolution tool. A sit-down, face-to-face meeting is necessary, and a concise description of roles and responsibilities must be presented. But a few other things are invaluable, too.

It’s important to reestablish a healthy culture with the team and ensure acceptable behaviormoving forward. This shouldn’t be done by lecturing. It shouldn’t be expressed in an exasperated tone either. Rather, make sure you conduct your meeting by modeling respect and integrity. Assume the best in your co-workers and back it up with words and actions that make it clear. Graciousness and amiability should preside, not hostility and annoyance.

Get the Right “Game Face” On.? Prepare yourself. Your “game face” must be a commitment to the greater good plus good faith efforts to buoy the environment and create a better working situation. It’s crucial to find common ground. This can be done with a simple and sincere reference to everyone wanting to do well, or a mention of some of your company’s most important values, or by outlining the basic goals of the project. It may be wisest to use a bit of each.

Conflict = Opportunity for Improvement.? It’s normal to dislike friction. Just remember, excellent organizations and great leaders have a habit of transforming conflict and tensions into occasions that make things work more smoothly, efficiently, and improve the positive bonds between employees. Don’t shrink from this opportunity. Instead of dreading conflict or becoming paralyzed by it, realize that conflicts can harvest new ideas and innovation—not just in how your company works, but also in how co-workers connect with each other.

Grace, empathy, forgiveness, cooperation, and better listening can be the result. If you treasure-hunt in the situation and invite that same positive attitude from your employees during conflict, better times are ahead.

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Mark A. Griffin is founder and Chief Consultant at In His Name HR LLC. He has over 20 years of HR experience.  In His Name HR helps organizations build high-performance Human Resource programs.

Visit them at In HIS Name HR or  Send Email

 

Yahoo! Scrapped Telecommuting—Should You?

Yahoo! Scrapped Telecommuting—Should You?


As a long-time veteran in the field of human resources (HR), I’ve seen telecommuting storm onto the scene through advances in technology. Telecommuting employees complete work from remote locations, and sometimes the method backfires.

In February 2013, Yahoo!’s CEO, Marissa Mayer, killed the long-standing policy that allowed employees to work from home. The news sent shockwaves in every direction, especially throughout high-tech industries. Many wondered whether the decision was a step backward and a signal of changes to come elsewhere.

Two months later, Mayer spoke at a human resources conference. She clarified that the new rule applied to just 200 of the 1200 Yahoo! employees. She reinforced the idea that collaboration and innovation happen best in an interactive environment. Even though the change was drastic for a tech company, she wasn’t backing down.

Many people feel their best work happens when they are uninterrupted and left alone, but even the best worker can hit some snags.

Five Common Pitfalls in Telecommuting

  1. Misalignment of organizational vision
  2. Loss of focus
  3. Derailed project or job expectations
  4. Poor time management Burnout (as work hours lengthen at a remote environment, like one’s home)
  5. Remember, the key principle for an ideal telecommuting situation is this:
  6. Working from home, or from another remote location, should include the same qualities that make work at the office productive.

Five Workplace Features that Help Telecommuters Succeed

  1. Workspace boundaries  – Can the employee shut the door when they need to work and otherwise maintain a good work-life balance?
  2. Ability to concentrate – Will children, friends, or other obligations frequently interrupt the employee?
  3. Organization – Can they make a schedule and stick to it?
  4. Productivity – Have they been given expectations and goals? Can they get help quickly if they hit an obstacle?
  5. Focus and Fitness – Can they take short, regular breaks throughout the day to stay fresh and avoid fatigue or burnout?

What single safeguard makes telecommuting most effective? A job description!

Do the groundwork and craft a solid job description for a telecommuter before telecommuting takes effect. When a manager latches onto telecommuting as a hot trend without making the necessary preparations, trouble lies ahead.

A job description is not only important from an employee management standpoint; it’s a strategic necessity.

Your organization’s productivity and growth can be stymied when skills and competencies are unknown variables. Be definitive.

What’s the future for telecommuting?

Telecommuting is here to stay! The kibosh on telecommuting seen at Yahoo! won’t be the norm. While a number of organizations may rein in their telecommuters, many organizations will increase their use of telecommuting.

They will also recognize the high value of the expertise from contracted workers through portals and agencies like UpWork.comFiverr.com, and Guru.com. Specialized workers will continue to work from home, their local coffee shop, or other spots as the trend becomes normalized and wireless networking becomes more widely available worldwide.

Now is the perfect time to set expectations and boundaries to make the best of the situation.

How many people do you know who telecommute? What has been your experience?  Would love to hear from our readers.

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Mark A. Griffin is founder and Chief Consultant at In His Name HR LLC. He has over 20 years of HR experience.  In His Name HR helps organizations build high-performance Human Resource programs.

Visit them at In HIS Name HR or  Send Email

 

How Bad Human Resource Practices Cost You Millions

How Bad Human Resource Practices Cost You Millions


Many potential clients seek a silver bullet when it comes to the hiring process. They want to set up electronic application systems and implement pre-employment testing to objectively and efficiently screen applicants so they can hire the best candidates.

They want to optimize the process, to speed the days to hire-up. They want candidates fast. They want a paperless process and a filtering system to eliminate candidates that don’t match their requirements.

Unfortunately, not being sure of what you’re doing, and working with unwise counsel, is a minefield you do not want to find yourself in and the results could be downright explosive.

I recently did some preliminary research on Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) cases that have headlined in the past several months, painting a damaging picture of some very prominent companies. The cases revolved around such factors as:

  • Pre-employment testing
  • Unlawful employment application questions
  • Disability discrimination

In actuality, many organizations, even those with the best intentions, ask questions that can inadvertently result in disparate treatment across a broad spectrum of minority candidates. Organizations also rely on invalid forms of pre-employment testing as a screening tool, ones they may not aware might disqualify minority candidates at a higher rate than non-minorities.

As a rule, the organizations that I meet with are not looking to hurt anyone or prevent any person from working at their organization as long as they’re qualified for the position in question. Most not only recognize the benefits that diversity brings to their organization but also share a worldview that embraces all cultures and all people. Regrettably, however, what’s in their heart does not matter one whit to the attorneys and the EEOC who show up to investigate claims of discrimination.

It’s easy to assume that the EEOC focuses only on large corporate organizations, high-profile global entities, as evidenced in such headlines as:

  • BMW to Pay $1.6 Million and Offer Jobs to Settle Federal Race Discrimination Lawsuit
  • Target to Pay $2.8M to Upper-Level Applicants in EEOC Settlement
  • United Airlines to Pay Over $1 Million to Settle Disability Lawsuit

On the contrary, there are many small to mid-sized organizations that are being dragged into court as well. For example:

  • Stack Bros. to Pay $140,000 to Settle EEOC Age Discrimination and Retaliation Suit
  • Texas Oil Field Services Company Pays $30,000 to Settle EEOC Retaliation Suit
  • EEOC Sues Seymour Midwest for Age Discrimination

No organization is too small to escape the potential penalty of discrimination, whether intended or unintended. All it takes is one or more disgruntled workers or applicants.

What might surprise you is that the same risk exists for those working in the nonprofit, church, or ministry sectors—you are just as vulnerable to the consequences of poorly managed human resource practices as any profit-driven enterprise. No altruistic or religious influence will stand up in court as an adequate defense or mitigate damages against your organization. This is just a sampling:

  • EEOC Sues United Bible Fellowship Ministries for Pregnancy Discrimination
  • Inconsistencies in Termination Decision Wipe Out Good Samaritan Ministries Victory
  • King’s Way Baptist Church Sued by EEOC for Retaliation
  • Nonprofits, churches, and ministry organizations are generally subject to state and federal laws that prohibit employment discrimination.

What should you do?

Do what great organizations do, and invest in solid HR practices. A qualified HR staff is fully trained and capable of helping you navigate successfully through the practices that can prevent costly litigation and eliminate those practices that might be unintentionally discriminatory.

You need a comprehensive human resources connection that your HR staff can source for this kind of guidance. We’re the map to get you through this minefield.

But it’s not just about risk management. Superior HR practices generate superior job candidates.

Want to read more about the cases cited in this article? Find more information and source articles here.

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Mark A. Griffin is founder and Chief Consultant at In His Name HR LLC. He has over 20 years of HR experience.  In His Name HR helps organizations build high-performance Human Resource programs. Visit them at In HIS Name HR or  Send Email

Success In 2019 ~ HR Trends In The Workplace


Enjoy watching Claudia Wert of Wells Fargo Advisors and Mark Griffin discuss In His Name HR and trends to look out for in 2019.

 

 

About Mark: With over 20 years of Human Resources experience at both fortune (Kodak, Quaker Oats, and Merck) as well as small and mid-sized companies, Mark has seen it all in the workplace.

About Claudia: A retirement plan specialist with Wert Investment Consulting Group, a wealth management practice within Wells Fargo Advisors. Her team advises on $260 million assets under management for high net worth families and businesses. Claudia’s partner, Robert Wert, was recognized in 2018 by Forbes magazine on their list of Best-In-State Wealth Advisors.

Berks Community Television Mission Berks Community Television’s mission is to enhance the unity and strength of the community by providing:

♦ A medium for community dialogue and educational opportunities

♦ A source of information of local, national and international origin

♦ A forum for the exchange of ideas on issues and topics of community interest

Dean of Academic Affairs

Now Recruiting ~ Dean of Academic Affairs


Looking to make a difference in our world? It’s time to use all of your education and experiences to be an instrument of change.

In HIS Name HR is honored to have been retained by the Institute of Lutheran Theology (ILT) to seek their next Dean of Academic Affairs.

The Institute of Lutheran Theology is a Christian faith community, seminary and graduate school that rigorously equips faithful pastors, teachers and lay people to effectively proclaim the gospel and serve Christ’s church throughout the world.

The Dean of Academic Affairs administers the academic programs of the Institute of Lutheran Theology (ILT) and is responsible for ensuring they fulfill ILT’s Mission Statement and Institutional Learning Outcomes. He/she takes a responsibility for policy related to ILT’s academic programs.

Some Position Requirements

  • A terminal degree in a theological discipline with experience teaching at a college, university, seminary, or graduate level.
  • 3–5 years of administrative experience in a higher education.
  • Ordained Lutheran pastor with ministry experience preferred.
  • Evidence of research competence.
  • Adherence to the Institute of Lutheran Theology’s Mission, Vision, Goals, and Values.

Some Essential Responsibilities

Teaching and Research

  • The Dean of Academic Affairs is a member of both the Graduate Faculty and Certificate Faculty and may teach courses as duties and time allow (normally, not more than two courses a year).
  • The Dean of Academic Affairs authors academic and general audience articles and books as time allows.

Administration

The Dean of Academic Affairs is responsible for administering and overseeing all the academic programs of ILT. As such, he or she:

  • Presides at the monthly meetings of the Graduate Faculty Senate and the Certificate Faculty Senate.
  • Seeks out and recommends new members to both faculties, as needed.
  • Recommends adjunct faculty to the President for appointment, as needed.
  • Assigns courses to faculty members.
  • Evaluates faculty effectiveness.
  • Ensures that students receive competent academic advising from faculty.
  • Develops academic policies in consultation with the Graduate Faculty Senate and the Certificate Faculty Senate and is responsible for implementing them.
  • Leads the faculties in developing, implementing, and improving the curricula of the academic programs so that they fulfill their Program Learning Outcomes.
  • Adjudicates student appeals presented according to the academic appeal policy.
  • Approves or denies all transfers of credit, course substitutions, and similar issues in collaboration with the registrar.
  • Recommends candidates for degrees to the Graduate Faculty Senate and the Certificate Faculty Senate and brings the faculties’ recommendations forward to the President and the Board of Directors.
  • Supervises the preparation of the text of each year’s academic catalog.
  • Publishes and maintains an updated faculty handbook.
  • Oversees the Academic Department budget.
  • Facilitates faculty development.
  • Negotiates articulation agreements with other institutions of higher learning in consultation with the faculties and the President.
  • Supervises the writing of grants, as needed.

Academic Assessment

The Dean of Academic Affairs is responsible for the ongoing assessment of ILT’s academic programs. As such, he or she:

  • Creates an Academic Assessment Plan for continual assessment of how well ILT’s academic programs achieve their Program Learning Outcomes.
  • Oversees the administration of the Academic Assessment Plan.
  • Prepares an annual Academic Assessment Report and submits it as a foundation for planning to the President and the faculty senates.
  • Works with faculty members to delegate assessment responsibilities, as needed.

General Educational Ministries

In addition to administering ILT’s academic programs, the Dean of Academic Affairs is responsible for ILT’s lay education ministries. As such, he or she:

  • Designs, builds, and maintains educational programs for lay people.
  • Communicates with potential instruction sites, pastors, instructors, and leaders.
  • Helps plan and prepare educational events for pastors and lay people.
  • Advertises and promotes educational ministries.
  • Builds and maintains relationships with all congregational partners.

Enrollment Services

The Dean of Academic Affairs cooperates with other staff and administrators in ILT’s recruitment efforts. As such, he or she:

  • Contributes toward developing and amending the Enrollment Management Plan.
  • Assists the Admissions Coordinator, as requested, in counseling with potential students.
  • Assists, as requested, in developing recruitment materials.
  • Performs other duties as assigned.

Some Required Personal Attributes

Conscientiousness

  • Displays a professional image at all times, even when facing significant job challenges.
  • Submits to the Cross of Jesus Christ.
  • Delivers on commitments made to others.
  • Takes ownership for resolving problems, rather than allowing them to persist or simply pointing them out to others.

Flexibility

  • Listens to all ideas and thoughts of others.
  • Adapts quickly to changing situations, including last-minute changes and scheduling disruptions.
  • Willing to consider new information, ideas, or strategies to achieve institutional goals.

Influencing/Negotiating

  • Anticipates potential reactions or concerns of staff and students to a situation and prepares to address these.
  • Boldly asserts the truth of the gospel.
  • Builds ownership for new initiatives or changes by involving those responsible for implementation in planning the details.

Integrity/Honesty

  • Avoids any action or situation that gives the appearance of unethical or inappropriate behavior.
  • Demonstrates the courage to do the right thing in difficult situations.
  • Holds oneself and others accountable for meeting the high standards of the institution’s integrity.
  • Leads by example by modeling ethical practices and standards.

Sensitivity

  • Treats others with respect, fairness, and consistency.
  • Demonstrates empathy and understanding when addressing sensitive issues with others.
  • Is hospitable in serving students.
  • Maintains appropriate standards of confidentiality.

Institutional Skills

  • Organizes department materials, including recruitment and department informational handouts.
  • Administers procedures for Academic Department.

Verbal Communication

  • Adjusts communication style and language to most effectively connect with different/diverse audiences and individuals.
  • Follows through with students and staff to ensure that important information has been understood.
  • Communicates information concisely and clearly.
  • Clearly explains complex concepts (e.g., schedules, policies, and procedures) and at an appropriate level of detail.
  • Maintains an appropriate level of contact with administration to keep them informed about important or controversial situations that may arise.
  • Communicates professionally with all levels of employees in the institution.

Other Interpersonal Skills

  • Possesses effective interpersonal communication skills, both written and verbal, plus organization and presentation skills.
  • Exhibits a strong desire to be a part of an institution that combines commitment to the divine with an entrepreneurial spirit.

Location will be Brookings SD.

Cover letters should include why you should be considered for the position and what would make you the best candidate.

Serious and confidential inquiries: Apply Through Indeed 

Position will be closed to further applicants June 1, 2019.

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