Vision Statements That Move Organizations Towards Excellence


Vision statements should consider how the market and your customer base may change within the next three, five, or seven years, how such changes can create opportunities for your organization, how to bridge the distance between how things are today and where you envision you want to be within your established timeframe, how you will surpass your competitors in order to gain greater market share, and also what you are doing collectively to capitalize on the changes in business conditions and your business’s needs.

Like a mission, an organization’s vision has ideally been created/ contributed to by all employees. The more buy-in an organization has among its employees, the greater the effectiveness of the vision. The vision should inspire—it demonstrates where the organization as a whole wants to be, and what will occur as it delivers on its mission. It is where an organization envisions itself in those three, five, or seven years. (We prefer five years, because that is a reasonable amount of time for most organizations to get to the next step.)

So, whereas the mission is what an organization does best every day, its vision is what the future looks like when it fulfills its mission exceedingly well. Some effective vision statements include Nike: To be the number one athletic company in the world, and Amazon: Our vision is to be earth’s most customer-centric company; to build a place where people can come to find and discover anything they might want to buy online.

When I worked for Gatorade, we developed an incredible advantage over the competition because we took the time to establish its vision, where they were going and when they wanted to get there, and ensured that every employee shared this vision. Gatorade’s competitors at the time, Powerade and All Sport, faded away as a result, because they lacked a commonly shared vision, they lacked direction—they lacked a road map.

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In His Name HR helps organizations build high performance Human Resources programs. Visit them at In HIS Name HR or e-mail them here.

Mark A. Griffin is the founder and chief consultant of In His Name HR LLC. Connect with him on LinkedIn or Twitter.

$305,000 in Employer Fines Upheld for I-9 Violations In HIS Name HR

$305,000 in Employer Fines Upheld for I-9 Violations


$305,000 in Employer Fines Upheld for I-9 Violations

Human resources can be complicated these days. Few would argue with that. But sometimes it’s the most basic human resources processes that can cause the greatest damage to any organization when not done right. And that disaster can be compounded if you lack a skilled professional to provide oversight.

When I say any organization, that includes any college, university, church, ministry, hospital, nonprofit or for-profit company, and even youth camps. Small organizations are not immune. No matter what size or kind of organization you are, if you employ staff, you must be diligent in following state and federal employment laws.

Recently, DLS Precision Fab, an LLC in Phoenix, Arizona, assumed they had made the right decision in hiring what appeared to be a seasoned HR professional. Much to their chagrin, despite his credentials, the human resources professional they hired proved inept and derelict in his duties when it came to maintaining the administration of the firm’s I-9s.

What is an I-9, you ask? Well, if you employ people and don’t know what an I-9 is, that’s a huge red flag, right there! Here is the definition as provided by ICE, the U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement:

Form I-9 is used for verifying the identity and employment authorization of individuals hired for employment in the United States. All U.S. employers must ensure proper completion of Form I-9 for each individual they hire for employment in the United States. This includes citizens and noncitizens. Both employees and employers (or authorized representatives of the employer) must complete the form. (Source)

We, as an established HR firm, are continually astonished that organizations think that because they are a school, church, camp, or nonprofit, the I-9 is not a requirement. The law clearly states: “All employers must complete and retain Form I-9, Employment Eligibility Verification, for every person they hire for employment on or after Nov. 6, 1986, in the U.S., as long as the person works for pay or other type of payment.”

All employers must have I-9s for every employee, regardless of the employer type or size!

Back to the case concerning DLS in Arizona, they were in a growth mode and had conscientiously made an effort to comply with state and federal employment laws by hiring an HR professional to handle compliance. Unfortunately, as the appeal by DLS states, the HR professional failed in his duties:

DLS is a company located in Phoenix, Arizona, providing custom sheet metal fabrication in a variety of industries. In the late 2000s, DLS grew to about 200 employees because of the expansion of a Department of Defense program. To deal with the sudden growth of its workforce and ensure its compliance with applicable state and federal employment laws, DLS hired a well-credentialed human resources director (the “HR director”). Unbeknownst to the company, however, this individual shirked his responsibility to ensure the company’s compliance with the INA to the point, as later described by DLS, “of literally stuffing the government’s correspondence in a drawer and never responding.”

Their legal problems started in 2009, when ICE served DLS with a notice of inspection and an administrative subpoena. After the onsite visit and a thorough review of their I-9 forms, DLS was served a notice of suspect documents. In October 2012, ICE served a notice of intent to fine.

DLS quickly responded by requesting a hearing before an administrative law judge, and ICE countered by filing a six-count complaint alleging that the employer failed to comply with employment verification requirements and continued to employ 15 individuals despite knowing they were ineligible for employment, all in violation of the Immigration Nationality Act.

Now, in 2017, in an attempt to reverse the violations, DLS Precision Fab appealed—and promptly lost. Richard Clifton, assigned to the case through the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals found DLS Precision Fab liable for 504 of the 508 alleged violations, 489 of which were I-9 paperwork violations and 15 of which involved DLS Precision Fab’s ongoing employment of ineligible aliens. As a result of the actions of the so-called HR professional, DLS Precision Fab was ordered to pay civil money penalties totaling more than $305,000.

Understandably, this has landed the company in dire straights, and it is now is in the midst of Chapter 11 bankruptcy proceedings. While we can’t be sure that these violations are solely responsible for the bankruptcy filing, it certainly hasn’t helped, adding to their already stressed organizational longevity.

Perhaps, like DLS, you assume your HR staff are competent and on top of complying with all your legal requirements. But are you sure?

The first thing you should you do is have all of your HR processes independently audited by a human resources processional, one with the right experience. We can help. Our HR Assessment, conducted by our skilled team of HR professionals will determine whether you’re protected or at great risk. We help clients across the country. Don’t hesitate—it could be costly.

Contact us today to find out more, and learn about our HR Assessment here.

 

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In His Name HR helps organizations build high performance Human Resources programs. Visit them at In HIS Name HR or e-mail them here.

Mark A. Griffin is the founder and chief consultant of In His Name HR LLC. Connect with him on LinkedIn or Twitter.

Creating Impactful Mission Statements


Successful organizations begin by establishing their mission, which is the core reason for their existence—the product or service they provide, who they provide it to, and the benefits of that product or service. A lack of an established mission means that not only are staff and management unsure of their purpose, but customers and vendors are also left in the dark, uncertain of what to expect.

An organization’s mission ideally defines what it does best every day and why, and reflects the customer’s needs as well. Having a mission is the foundation upon which a high-performing organization’s dreams and potential become reality. Essentially, it affirms the reason(s) why an organization exists.

Under the guidance of a project facilitator, a team of senior management begins by developing a framework of what they believe the mission should be. The facilitator shares and explains this mission framework to each supervisory layer, soliciting input on each occasion, and ultimately shares it with the employees who then sit down with a good human resources representative in a roundtable session to discuss it and generate further input. The facilitator may need to go back and forth a few times before a final product is derived. Once the majority of employees and management agree to the refined mission, all employees need to agree to respect and support it.

A primary benefit to creating or revisiting a mission is that it opens up communication within and throughout an organization. Every successful organization has a clearly established mission, one that has been developed with input from all employees collectively, not simply flowing down from the top. By engaging employees in establishing their organization’s mission, they become fully invested in it. The mission must be ingrained within the organization’s culture. Not only are employees and customers made familiar with the organization’s mission; candidates are also exposed to the mission of high-performing organizations during the interview process, before they’re offered a position.

Some tips to remember when writing a mission statement: 1) keep it short and easy to remember; 2) specify who your target customer is and describe the advantages you offer; and 3) define your product clearly and how it differs from the competition.

You may be wondering how you can say all that and still keep your mission statement short and memorable. Here are two strong examples from high-performing organizations with effective mission statements.

Google: We organize the world‘s information and make it universally accessible and useful. Their marketplace? The world. Their product and its advantages? Organizing the world’s information to make it easily accessible and useful. They do this and they do it exceedingly well.

Starbucks: We inspire and nurture the human spirit — one person, one cup, and one neighborhood at a time. Their marketplace? Also, essentially the world, yet they stress the individual: one person, one neighborhood at a time to maintain a personal feel. We are already very familiar with their product and social coffeehouse environment, aren’t we?

Let’s look at a Bible College and Seminary Mission.

Lancaster Bible College|Capital Seminary & Graduate School:  Our focus is on your journey to fulfill God’s purpose for your life. Our mission has remained constant since 1933: To educate Christian students to think and live a biblical worldview and to proclaim Christ by serving Him in the Church and society.

And finally a Private Christian College.

Messiah College: Our mission is to educate men and women toward maturity of intellect, character and Christian faith in preparation for lives of service, leadership and reconciliation in church and society.

In addition to a mission statement, all high-performing organizations possess a clearly defined vision. Organizations with an established vision have a workplace of direction, purpose, and achievement. These organizations envision where they want to be and do the appropriate things to get there. Every employee is given a copy of this road map.

 

In His Name HR helps organizations build high performance Human Resources programs. Visit them at In HIS Name HR or e-mail them here.

Mark A. Griffin is the founder and chief consultant of In His Name HR LLC. Connect with him on LinkedIn or Twitter.

Kingdom Minded ~ Defining your Mission, Vision and Values


When we meet with people to discuss strengthening their HR practices, we often use the term “Kingdom-minded organization.” More often than not, they are intrigued as to precisely how we define what potentially encompasses a considerably broad scope or approach. Certainly, many Christian business people, academia professionals, pastors, and consultants have their own ideas as to what constitutes a Kingdom-minded organization. My own Kingdom-minded human resources organization has worked hard to develop what we feel is a clear, actionable, and measurable articulation of just what a Kingdom-minded organization means to us and how to achieve it, and, as a result, the organizational leaders we work with express enthusiasm to achieve these goals, and are willing to invest their precious time, dollars, and energy into making their organization a prosperous one, and one reflective of Christ and His teachings.

In terms of what comprises the framework of a Kingdom-minded organization, the model I developed contains principles that apply to marketplace organizations, colleges and universities, churches, and non-profit organizations alike.

A Kingdom-minded organization puts Christ first, with a focus on integrity, honesty, and straightforward dealings with students, alumni, parents, staff, contractors and suppliers, etc. Such an organization possesses clearly delineated mission, vision, and core value statements. It has agreed upon goals and objectives, especially in the realms of mission execution, customer service, production, and quality.

Being a Kingdom-minded organization does not in any way preclude prosperity. On the contrary, it aims to be prosperous for the benefit of its key stakeholders, leadership, owners, employees, and the organization’s community. They should—they must—strive to do great things, marrying their godly goals with the fruits of success, those of a job well done. By no means should they consider themselves as unable to participate in the results-driven culture of winning U.S. organizations.

Mission, Vision, And Values (MVV)

When mapping out the future of an organization that professes to strive to become high performing, management must create its mission, vision, and value statements (MVVs) or ignite existing ones by recreating them. Much has been written on what should comprise mission, vision, and value statements. I always suggest keeping them simple—simple concepts that all employees can remember and fully support. It’s difficult to fully commit to and “own” an organization’s ideals if they are so complicated, convoluted, or vague that the employees can’t remember them clearly.

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In His Name HR helps organizations build high performance Human Resources programs. Visit them at In HIS Name HR or e-mail them here.

Mark A. Griffin is the founder and chief consultant of In His Name HR LLC. Connect with him on LinkedIn or Twitter.

Human Resources Perspective on Organizational Mission, Vision and Values


When I was asked to blog about forward-thinking human resources content to Christian Higher Ed Professionals, I knew I would have to start by constructing a solid foundation and build upon that. Having spent over 25 years in corporate America working alongside highly respected HR thought leaders at such organizations as Kodak, PepsiCo, and Merck Inc., I thought back to what makes certain organizations succeed while others fail.

Six years ago, I founded and now lead a growing HR consulting firm that supports organizations across the United States, organizations with one thing in common—they are Christian-based, whether for-profit companies or ministries and churches, and all possess essentially the same strengths, weaknesses, and opportunities. No amount of technology or reengineering solves their issues. At the end of the day, it is the people within those organizations who make the difference.

What singles out certain organizations is the ability of their leadership to align their people effort to a collective MVV—mission, vision and values. Without this foundation, organizations flounder and employees lack direction. Without identified and established MVVs, HR leaders are unable to align their HR programs to achieve high performance. I have witnessed firsthand what happens when organizations lack this essential organizational mantra. What’s tragic is that establishing a company’s MVV is not only basic but quite simple to do. It requires nothing more than to identify why you do what you do and how you want to do it.

In the coming posts, I will guide you through the necessary steps to identify your core beliefs and goals, your MVV. Then we will explore how to skillfully integrate this MVV into your HR process to ensure you deliver on your mission, achieve your vision, and work within the values you establish. I will also define for you a term we use: “Kingdom-minded organization.” In my experience, the use of this Christian-oriented term illuminates how your organization will present its MVV differently to those of secular organizations.

Once you spend some time reflecting on what is meaningful to you and your organization, you will have taken the first steps on our journey together to create a Kingdom-minded organization of like-minded individuals working together to achieve high performance.

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In His Name HR helps organizations build high-performance Human Resources programs. Visit them at In HIS Name HR or e-mail them.

Mark A. Griffin is the founder and chief consultant of In His Name HR LLC. Connect with him on LinkedIn or Twitter.

 

Why Developing A High-Performance Employee Review Process Matters

Why Developing A High-Performance Employee Review Process Matters


Most employees loath them; many managers avoid them. High Performance Organizations have them, and they do what they’re designed to do—evaluate precisely the performance of each employee.

Feel like you don’t need them? Here are 10 great reasons that should change your mind.

  1. Aligning performance to goals and objectives

Most organization employees we meet with say they have no idea what the yearly top two or three goals are for their organization.  A great performance program sets these goals as their starting point. Ninety-nine percent of employees in this country want to do well at work, but we lack leaders who know how to align their desire to achieve to the organizational goals.

  1. Providing a basis for promotion/transfer/termination

Many organizations are not transparent concerning how to be promoted.  A performance review process more readily identifies those employees who deserve promotion and those who require lateral shift (transfer) or need to enter into a remedial program. This system also aids career planning.

  1. Enhancing employees’ effectiveness

Most people really do want to be better at their jobs! Helping employees to identify their strengths and weaknesses and informing them of the organization’s expectations concerning their performance helps them to better understand the role they play and increases work efficiency. Feedback reinforces good performance and discourages poor performance.

  1. Aiding in designing training and development programs

Instead of creating “programs of the month,” you can use performance review data to more accurately ascertain training needs and identify skills that need to be developed in order to tailor-make the most effective training and development programs.

  1. Building teams

Counseling employees corrects misconceptions, which might result in work alienation. Performance management also helps employees to internalize the norms and values of the organization. (I have met leaders who have not talked to their employees about their performance since 2009!)

  1. Removing discontent

Performance management puts all employees on the same measuring tape. Identifying and removing factors responsible for worker discontent motivates them to perform better at work. Performance management helps to create a positive and healthy work environment in the organization.

  1. Developing interpersonal relationships

Relations between superiors and subordinates can be improved through the realization that there exists a mutual dependence that leads to better performance and success. By facilitating employees to perform introspection, self-evaluation and goal setting, their behavior can be modified. Better interpersonal relationships lead to team building.

  1. Aiding wage administration

Performance management can help to develop fairer and more equitable base lines for reward allocation, wage fixation, raises, incentives, etc.

  1. Exercising control

A performance review process provides a means to exercise control of projects focused on, and helps keep employees aligned to the agreed upon annual goals and objectives.

  1. Improving communication

Performance management serves as a mechanism for improved communication between superiors and subordinates.  Often times managers shy away from counseling employees.  When the right system is in place, especially is it is employee driven, it forces discussions on a regular basis.

In closing, my experiences lead me to support employee driven programs.  Programs that rely on managers and leaders have a higher propensity for failure.  Simple yet meaningful programs that include goals, objectives, behaviors, an employee development component and stretch assignments meet what most employees’ desire.

How important are employee performance reviews in your organization?  We would like to know.  Please leave comments below. 

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In His Name HR helps organizations build high performance Human Resources programs. Visit them at In HIS Name HR or e-mail them here.

Mark A. Griffin is the founder and chief consultant of In His Name HR LLC. Connect with him on LinkedIn or Twitter.

Great Organizations Are Built On Solid Job Descriptions

Great Organizations Are Built on Solid Job Descriptions


Job descriptions (JDs) are just so 1980s,” a young HR graduate recently commented to me, He could not be more wrong. Having worked in HR for over 25 years, I can tell you that some things just don’t change—and shouldn’t change.  New technology consistently bombards us; faster, better, and sleeker processes seem to overwhelm us.

One thing that will never change is the fact that, in order to be a High Performance Organization, you still need to get some  “old school” work done. Don’t let technology and “the new workplace” fool you. Now, more than ever, you need JDs.

Here are eight good reasons why:

Recruitment – As you grow and expand, it is almost impossible to hire legally or correctly when lacking a solid, well-written job description.

Teambuilding – It is difficult for Teams to form and support each other when job duties are gray and tasks constantly conflict or interrupt each other. It is enlightening to know what each Team Member is responsible to accomplish.

Performance management – This enables you  to set measurable performance goals based on duties listed in the corresponding job description. Having them listed, in writing, signifies their importance.

Training and employee development – You can use job descriptions, along with descriptions of possible job promotions, as a tool to determine what to pursue in regards to classes, seminars, and other career development activities in order to close gaps.

Compensation- JDs can be helpful in developing a standardized compensation program with minimums, maximums, and target pay for each position. They help highlight internal equity issues to decision makers and contribute to fairness.

Recognition and rewards – You can use job descriptions as a baseline for performance, and as a tool to encourage performance “above and beyond” the job description, in order to distribute recognition and rewards or just plain old praise!

Discipline – Sometimes employees just don’t do what needs to be done. Hopefully, this does not happen at your place of work, but sometimes Team Members fail each other. If you need to, you can use job descriptions to illustrate when employees are not performing up to agreed-upon standards.

Essential job function analysis – The physical and environmental setting is important in order to provide employees, including new hires, who need accommodation. Not only is this the right thing to do, but it is also the law.  As of July 1992, the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) mandates that an organization assist an employee when a request is made for a reasonable accommodation under the ADA.

Some Key Points to Ensure a Great Job Description Process

  • Have the employee own their description
  • Remember that no one knows the job better than the employee doing it
  • Make the employee accountable to complete it and have HR review it
  • The manager should have final JD authority and reserve the right to make changes to the final document, incorporating dialogue with the employee

Don’t make JDs more work then they have to be. Instead, make it a process to enjoy and learn from—it does not have to be awful.

Be joyful and helpful with the process, and your staff will love you for it!

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In His Name HR helps organizations build high performance Human Resources programs. Visit them at In HIS Name HR or e-mail them here.

Mark A. Griffin is the founder and chief consultant of In His Name HR LLC. Connect with him on LinkedIn or Twitter.

 

 

How We Became Number One On Google In HIS Name HR

How We Became Number One on Google


Social Media and Search Engine Optimization

This blog post is out of the ordinary. We are human resource experts not marketing or social media experts by any means. We have been asked way too many times and have had to explain in painstaking detail the same question:

How did In HIS Name HR climb to the top slot in Google’s search response to the query for “Christian Human Resources?”

Having been peppered with this question from a wide array of sources, we decided to answer it here, and share our methodology.

Social media can be confusing to many people, but in reality it is very simple. Social media programs are nothing more than tools that allow like-minded people to communicate. What is critical to remember is that not all people use all programs. Therefore, to reach a large and diverse group of people, you need to reach them where they are, instead of hoping they’ll somehow stumble across you.

Many people make the mistake of only using Facebook, or Twitter, when they attempt to market their voice to the world. But what about all those people who use other social media programs instead, those who are not on Facebook or Twitter? If you rely only on those two platforms, you are essentially missing out on millions of potential people who won’t hear your message.

What you want to do is essentially send your same message out through all the various social media programs. However, you will need to tailor the way in which your message is sent out to accommodate the differing requirements or constraints of each social media platform.

To start, make sure what you present fits your voice—that is, how you want people to perceive you and your services. It is a combination of your mission, vision and values. Your voice can also be defined as a “niche” that you are working to create for your organization.

In just 6 short years we have been able to develop a strong social media audience.

We now have:

Over 21,000 followers on Twitter

Facebook Business Page now exceeds 3,100

Over 5,700 connections on LinkedIn

And our latest social media platform Instagram, now exceeds 2,000 plus followers

Decrease Turnover ~ Develop On-Boarding Excellence

Decrease Turnover ~ Develop On-Boarding Excellence


Many leaders think that the reason turnover has decreased is because of the bad economy. That’s not entirely accurate. As the 2014 Equifax research shows, on average, more than half of all employees who left their job in the past year did so within the first twelve months.

Concerned? You should be. The average cost to recruit a single new employee is well over $4,000 and will take on average 42 days to fill the vacancy (SHRM study 2016). This figure does not reflect the time spent or the decrease in morale as the search drags on. Since the rate of turnover is potentially the highest during the first year, let’s take a closer look at one way we can stop the hemorrhage.

There is a misperception shared by many of today’s leaders that orientation and on-boarding are essentially one and the same. They are not. Simply stated, orientation comprises the tactical tasks to complete in order to get an employee ready to get to work, for example, computer login registration, physical building access, facility tours, and a basic HR overview of policies such as benefits and the employee handbook.

So, how is on-boarding different? On-boarding is assimilating your new employee to the culture of your organization. It is about introducing your new employee to your organization’s values, its norms, providing a recipe that lists the ingredients of what makes up your organization’s culture, and how they can blend effectively with them to create a desirable end product, leading to the greater success of your organization as a whole.  An effective program helps the new employee align themselves to your Mission, Vision and Values.  This is a very important step to organizational success.

Want to create an effective on-boarding program? Consider these 4 steps.

Step #1: Use a Focus Group

Create a focus group that consists of the most recent six people you hired. These are the individuals who best know what does and doesn’t work— they’ve just lived through it! Task the focus group facilitator with developing a list of items that should be included in the on-boarding program. And, once your HR leader develops the final program, schedule the focus group to meet again to ensure the legitimacy of the program.

Step #2:  Build Employee Development into the Process

Ensure job description review, refinement, and updating are all a part of your process. Have every new employee consult with co-workers and corresponding leaders to update their job description so that they have full ownership. Have them present to their leader the key areas of development for promote-ability based on future career assignments. Get them thinking about their own development now, not after they tire of their position.

Step #3: Build in Key Meetings with Various Stakeholders

Arrange for new employees to meet with a different manager in separate departments several times over the course of some months. Earlier in my career, we built a process at the Quaker Oats Company where all new employees or transferees would go to lunch with different department managers and several members of their department. It is a fantastic way for new employees to feel part of the Mission of the organization.

Step #4: Ensure New Employees Own the Process

Create a checklist for employees to follow and update going forward. Have them meet with their manager twice a month to discuss how the process is working. Ensure participation is built into their 90-day review. Holding them accountable will ensure they take an active role in the process.

One thing is for sure—most organizations have veered away from progressive HR programs in the last several years, losing time and money, as well as valuable employees.

Isn’t it time you started focusing on the fundamentals and take the time to bring your people on board correctly? After all, people are your most valuable resource. It’s one of the best investments you can make in the long-term success of your organization.

What on-boarding programs have you had success with?

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In His Name HR helps organizations build high performance Human Resources programs. Visit them at In HIS Name HR or e-mail them here.

Mark A. Griffin is the founder and chief consultant of In His Name HR LLC. Connect with him on LinkedIn or Twitter.

 

How To Learn from Employee Turnover

How To Learn from Employee Turnover


Why are people leaving your organization?

My client’s eyes glazed over when I asked her this. She didn’t know why more than 13 percent of her workforce left every year – and hadn’t even thought about figuring out the reasons.

In my experience, most organizations fail to document why people leave.

If they do conduct exit interviews, they often don’t probe deeply enough. Or, they fail to effectively learn from their findings and implement change for the better.

People Join organizations they leave managers.” Bill Hybels

How to Keep People

According to The Wall Street Journal, by the time a talented worker has decided to leave, it’s probably too late to make the necessary improvements to keep them. But, finding out why people aren’t staying with your organization is critical to your future success, especially in tough economic times.

Keeping competent employees is one of the best ways to save your organization a lot of money and keep a cohesive and healthy workplace culture. The high cost of hiring and training employees warrants that you learn from what isn’t working, every time.

There are several reasons why people leave.  In previous articles we have discussed many.  One area that continues to gain attention is organizational vision or lack thereof. Make sure your vision is properly integrated within your HR programs.  Employees need to be part of it and understand where you are going.  A recent article from Barnard Marr on CNBC.com cites “No Vision” as being a leading cause of turnover.  I agree.  Most employees want a hope and a future and a great vision that is bought in by all helps create energy in the workplace.

So, appreciate the rich source of information that a good exit interview brings!

A good exit interview finds out these three (3) things:

  • What the work climate is really like?
  • Whether and how are your managers are failing.
  • What’s missing?

Do your employees get what they really need to do well? If people are leaving too frequently, it’s time to find out why.

Make sure your exit interview includes these three (3) questions:

  • When did you realize you wanted to leave?
  • Did you and your manager set goals and objectives together?
  • How often did you receive helpful feedback from your leadership?

Ending Well

First, conduct your exit interview with a spirit of grace and graciousness. Your concern and honest inquiry into the reasons your employee is leaving will yield valuable insights if you put them at ease. This is where your core values come in.

Second, remember to set up an exit interview at a time designed to give you the best information. Don’t rush in at the last minute, just before your employee’s departure, or try to get information after they’ve already moved on.

Finally, wish the employee well in their new endeavor. At some point, they may want to come back. If they feel cared for during this last important experience, they will know that the door is still open. Losing a talented employee is disappointing, but it might be redeemed if they happily return in the future.

Have you used exit interviewing before? Please take a few moments and tell our community of readers your experience.

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In His Name HR helps organizations build high performance Human Resources programs. Visit them at In HIS Name HR or e-mail them here.

Mark A. Griffin is the founder and chief consultant of In His Name HR LLC. Connect with him on LinkedIn or Twitter.