How Bad Human Resource Practices Cost You Millions

How Bad Human Resource Practices Cost You Millions


Many potential clients seek a silver bullet when it comes to the hiring process. They want to set up electronic application systems and implement pre-employment testing to objectively and efficiently screen applicants so they can hire the best candidates.

They want to optimize the process, to speed the days to hire-up. They want candidates fast. They want a paperless process and a filtering system to eliminate candidates that don’t match their requirements.

Unfortunately, not being sure of what you’re doing, and working with unwise counsel, is a minefield you do not want to find yourself in and the results could be downright explosive.

I recently did some preliminary research on Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) cases that have headlined in the past several months, painting a damaging picture of some very prominent companies. The cases revolved around such factors as:

  • Pre-employment testing
  • Unlawful employment application questions
  • Disability discrimination

In actuality, many organizations, even those with the best intentions, ask questions that can inadvertently result in disparate treatment across a broad spectrum of minority candidates. Organizations also rely on invalid forms of pre-employment testing as a screening tool, ones they may not aware might disqualify minority candidates at a higher rate than non-minorities.

As a rule, the organizations that I meet with are not looking to hurt anyone or prevent any person from working at their organization as long as they’re qualified for the position in question. Most not only recognize the benefits that diversity brings to their organization but also share a worldview that embraces all cultures and all people. Regrettably, however, what’s in their heart does not matter one whit to the attorneys and the EEOC who show up to investigate claims of discrimination.

It’s easy to assume that the EEOC focuses only on large corporate organizations, high-profile global entities, as evidenced in such headlines as:

  • BMW to Pay $1.6 Million and Offer Jobs to Settle Federal Race Discrimination Lawsuit
  • Target to Pay $2.8M to Upper-Level Applicants in EEOC Settlement
  • United Airlines to Pay Over $1 Million to Settle Disability Lawsuit

On the contrary, there are many small to mid-sized organizations that are being dragged into court as well. For example:

  • Stack Bros. to Pay $140,000 to Settle EEOC Age Discrimination and Retaliation Suit
  • Texas Oil Field Services Company Pays $30,000 to Settle EEOC Retaliation Suit
  • EEOC Sues Seymour Midwest for Age Discrimination

No organization is too small to escape the potential penalty of discrimination, whether intended or unintended. All it takes is one or more disgruntled workers or applicants.

What might surprise you is that the same risk exists for those working in the nonprofit, church, or ministry sectors—you are just as vulnerable to the consequences of poorly managed human resource practices as any profit-driven enterprise. No altruistic or religious influence will stand up in court as an adequate defense or mitigate damages against your organization. This is just a sampling:

  • EEOC Sues United Bible Fellowship Ministries for Pregnancy Discrimination
  • Inconsistencies in Termination Decision Wipe Out Good Samaritan Ministries Victory
  • King’s Way Baptist Church Sued by EEOC for Retaliation
  • Nonprofits, churches, and ministry organizations are generally subject to state and federal laws that prohibit employment discrimination.

What should you do?

Do what great organizations do, and invest in solid HR practices. A qualified HR staff is fully trained and capable of helping you navigate successfully through the practices that can prevent costly litigation and eliminate those practices that might be unintentionally discriminatory.

You need a comprehensive human resources connection that your HR staff can source for this kind of guidance. We’re the map to get you through this minefield.

But it’s not just about risk management. Superior HR practices generate superior job candidates.

Want to read more about the cases cited in this article? Find more information and source articles here.

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Mark A. Griffin is founder and Chief Consultant at In His Name HR LLC. He has over 20 years of HR experience.  In His Name HR helps organizations build high-performance Human Resource programs. Visit them at In HIS Name HR or  Send Email

Success In 2019 ~ HR Trends In The Workplace


Enjoy watching Claudia Wert of Wells Fargo Advisors and Mark Griffin discuss In His Name HR and trends to look out for in 2019.

 

 

About Mark: With over 20 years of Human Resources experience at both fortune (Kodak, Quaker Oats, and Merck) as well as small and mid-sized companies, Mark has seen it all in the workplace.

About Claudia: A retirement plan specialist with Wert Investment Consulting Group, a wealth management practice within Wells Fargo Advisors. Her team advises on $260 million assets under management for high net worth families and businesses. Claudia’s partner, Robert Wert, was recognized in 2018 by Forbes magazine on their list of Best-In-State Wealth Advisors.

Berks Community Television Mission Berks Community Television’s mission is to enhance the unity and strength of the community by providing:

♦ A medium for community dialogue and educational opportunities

♦ A source of information of local, national and international origin

♦ A forum for the exchange of ideas on issues and topics of community interest

Dean of Academic Affairs

Now Recruiting ~ Dean of Academic Affairs


Looking to make a difference in our world? It’s time to use all of your education and experiences to be an instrument of change.

In HIS Name HR is honored to have been retained by the Institute of Lutheran Theology (ILT) to seek their next Dean of Academic Affairs.

The Institute of Lutheran Theology is a Christian faith community, seminary and graduate school that rigorously equips faithful pastors, teachers and lay people to effectively proclaim the gospel and serve Christ’s church throughout the world.

The Dean of Academic Affairs administers the academic programs of the Institute of Lutheran Theology (ILT) and is responsible for ensuring they fulfill ILT’s Mission Statement and Institutional Learning Outcomes. He/she takes a responsibility for policy related to ILT’s academic programs.

Some Position Requirements

  • A terminal degree in a theological discipline with experience teaching at a college, university, seminary, or graduate level.
  • 3–5 years of administrative experience in a higher education.
  • Ordained Lutheran pastor with ministry experience preferred.
  • Evidence of research competence.
  • Adherence to the Institute of Lutheran Theology’s Mission, Vision, Goals, and Values.

Some Essential Responsibilities

Teaching and Research

  • The Dean of Academic Affairs is a member of both the Graduate Faculty and Certificate Faculty and may teach courses as duties and time allow (normally, not more than two courses a year).
  • The Dean of Academic Affairs authors academic and general audience articles and books as time allows.

Administration

The Dean of Academic Affairs is responsible for administering and overseeing all the academic programs of ILT. As such, he or she:

  • Presides at the monthly meetings of the Graduate Faculty Senate and the Certificate Faculty Senate.
  • Seeks out and recommends new members to both faculties, as needed.
  • Recommends adjunct faculty to the President for appointment, as needed.
  • Assigns courses to faculty members.
  • Evaluates faculty effectiveness.
  • Ensures that students receive competent academic advising from faculty.
  • Develops academic policies in consultation with the Graduate Faculty Senate and the Certificate Faculty Senate and is responsible for implementing them.
  • Leads the faculties in developing, implementing, and improving the curricula of the academic programs so that they fulfill their Program Learning Outcomes.
  • Adjudicates student appeals presented according to the academic appeal policy.
  • Approves or denies all transfers of credit, course substitutions, and similar issues in collaboration with the registrar.
  • Recommends candidates for degrees to the Graduate Faculty Senate and the Certificate Faculty Senate and brings the faculties’ recommendations forward to the President and the Board of Directors.
  • Supervises the preparation of the text of each year’s academic catalog.
  • Publishes and maintains an updated faculty handbook.
  • Oversees the Academic Department budget.
  • Facilitates faculty development.
  • Negotiates articulation agreements with other institutions of higher learning in consultation with the faculties and the President.
  • Supervises the writing of grants, as needed.

Academic Assessment

The Dean of Academic Affairs is responsible for the ongoing assessment of ILT’s academic programs. As such, he or she:

  • Creates an Academic Assessment Plan for continual assessment of how well ILT’s academic programs achieve their Program Learning Outcomes.
  • Oversees the administration of the Academic Assessment Plan.
  • Prepares an annual Academic Assessment Report and submits it as a foundation for planning to the President and the faculty senates.
  • Works with faculty members to delegate assessment responsibilities, as needed.

General Educational Ministries

In addition to administering ILT’s academic programs, the Dean of Academic Affairs is responsible for ILT’s lay education ministries. As such, he or she:

  • Designs, builds, and maintains educational programs for lay people.
  • Communicates with potential instruction sites, pastors, instructors, and leaders.
  • Helps plan and prepare educational events for pastors and lay people.
  • Advertises and promotes educational ministries.
  • Builds and maintains relationships with all congregational partners.

Enrollment Services

The Dean of Academic Affairs cooperates with other staff and administrators in ILT’s recruitment efforts. As such, he or she:

  • Contributes toward developing and amending the Enrollment Management Plan.
  • Assists the Admissions Coordinator, as requested, in counseling with potential students.
  • Assists, as requested, in developing recruitment materials.
  • Performs other duties as assigned.

Some Required Personal Attributes

Conscientiousness

  • Displays a professional image at all times, even when facing significant job challenges.
  • Submits to the Cross of Jesus Christ.
  • Delivers on commitments made to others.
  • Takes ownership for resolving problems, rather than allowing them to persist or simply pointing them out to others.

Flexibility

  • Listens to all ideas and thoughts of others.
  • Adapts quickly to changing situations, including last-minute changes and scheduling disruptions.
  • Willing to consider new information, ideas, or strategies to achieve institutional goals.

Influencing/Negotiating

  • Anticipates potential reactions or concerns of staff and students to a situation and prepares to address these.
  • Boldly asserts the truth of the gospel.
  • Builds ownership for new initiatives or changes by involving those responsible for implementation in planning the details.

Integrity/Honesty

  • Avoids any action or situation that gives the appearance of unethical or inappropriate behavior.
  • Demonstrates the courage to do the right thing in difficult situations.
  • Holds oneself and others accountable for meeting the high standards of the institution’s integrity.
  • Leads by example by modeling ethical practices and standards.

Sensitivity

  • Treats others with respect, fairness, and consistency.
  • Demonstrates empathy and understanding when addressing sensitive issues with others.
  • Is hospitable in serving students.
  • Maintains appropriate standards of confidentiality.

Institutional Skills

  • Organizes department materials, including recruitment and department informational handouts.
  • Administers procedures for Academic Department.

Verbal Communication

  • Adjusts communication style and language to most effectively connect with different/diverse audiences and individuals.
  • Follows through with students and staff to ensure that important information has been understood.
  • Communicates information concisely and clearly.
  • Clearly explains complex concepts (e.g., schedules, policies, and procedures) and at an appropriate level of detail.
  • Maintains an appropriate level of contact with administration to keep them informed about important or controversial situations that may arise.
  • Communicates professionally with all levels of employees in the institution.

Other Interpersonal Skills

  • Possesses effective interpersonal communication skills, both written and verbal, plus organization and presentation skills.
  • Exhibits a strong desire to be a part of an institution that combines commitment to the divine with an entrepreneurial spirit.

Location will be Brookings SD.

Cover letters should include why you should be considered for the position and what would make you the best candidate.

Serious and confidential inquiries: Apply Through Indeed 

Position will be closed to further applicants June 1, 2019.

Want to get future vacancies and blog updates? Subscribe here: Click

Is Facebook Really Risky in the Workplace?

Is Facebook Really Risky in the Workplace?


Learn how to make social media use in the workplace a win for everybody.

What is your organization’s policy on social media? It’s time to better understand this powerful tool and make it work for you.

Research from Fierce, a Seattle-based training and development company, concludes that 80 percent of workers log onto Facebook during working hours.

Facebook is not going away. LinkedIn is right behind, and if you don’t know what Instagram or Snapchat is, well, you’re just missing out. Having worked in an era before these tools existed and then became popular, I offer you some vital insights from a Human Resources perspective.

Transforming connections and communications

In an age of smartphones, websites, and computers with preloaded social media integration, social media technology is standard fare in most environments. Customers routinely “check in” and post photos from restaurants, shops, attractions, and events. Pastors tell attendees to tweet quotes from their sermons. Celebrities make big announcements on Twitter, and the most important world news breaks on social media first. It’s not going anywhere. In fact, it’s growing, integrating, and upgrading faster than ever.

Despite this prominence, only 51 percent of organizations have any policy on social media. Some organizational leaders feel participation hurts productivity or even contributes to interpersonal problems (think of publicly bad-mouthing leadership), yet many more believe its use is crucial to good morale and a happy working environment, and current research bears this out.

Today, a whole new generation of workers considers social media a nonnegotiable aspect of their job environment. In a recent study by Fast Company, 40 percent of college students and 45 percent of young professionals said they would turn down a job or accept less pay rather than work for a company that disallowed social media use.

Be clever in how you integrate social media usage into your  organizational culture and policies. If you have bans on social media, review and amend them to fit the times. If you don’t have a policy yet, remember these key points before issuing sweeping prohibitions on the technology:

  • When treated as adults, most employees behave as adults.
  • Give great guidelines up front—don’t wait for a crisis. Regularly encourage responsible posting on social media.
  • Assign someone who understands social media to create a vision of how your company can be positively perceived or promoted online, and then articulate that vision clearly.

Risk vs. Reward

Without guidance, employee involvement with social media can be risky, but social media remains an excellent tool to engage participants and current or future customers and get your message out. The right use of this powerful tool can benefit everyone involved.

Many opportunities exist to mobilize your workforce to connect with others and broadcast a healthy and positive image of your company or non-profit. Some of the most productive and profitable companies have integrated it well, and so can you.

What type of policies do you have in place on social media?

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Mark Griffin is founder and Chief Consultant at In His Name HR LLC. He has over 20 years of HR experience.  Follow Mark on FacebookTwitter and LinkedIn.

The Harvest Is Plentiful IHNHR

The Harvest Is Plentiful but the Workers Are Few


Then he said to his disciples, “The harvest is plentiful but the workers are few. Ask the Lord of the harvest, therefore, to send out workers into his harvest field.

~ Matthew 9:37-38

This was so very true when it was written and still so very true today. The workers available to bring the good word to the world of Christ’s saving blood are few. This piece of Scripture is the foundation of what it is that we do here at In HIS Name HR. We help create the workers; we develop Christian business leader, to be the worker to gently get the message out to the workplace. I have worked for organizations where we took care of employees’ financial needs by paying them. We took care of their medical needs by providing health care benefits. But we hardly come across any companies, even Christian-owned companies, that provide a venue to reach employees’ spiritual needs.

Christian-owned companies should feel obligated to provide spiritual benefits

We can no longer go to church on Sunday and work on Monday without addressing our faith. We are obligated to develop our organizations in a way in which it is comfortable for employees to be led to Christ.

If you are sharing your faith with your teams, if you are developing ways of integrating Christ into your workplace, you are building a “Kingdom Minded” Organization.

Help our community of readers

For those of you in the “Marketplace”, How do your share your faith at work? When do you know you have gone too far? We would love to know your experiences.

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Mark Griffin is founder and Chief Consultant at In His Name HR LLC. He has over 20 years of HR experience.   Follow Mark and In HIS Name HR on FacebookTwitter and LinkedIn.

Lead Employees to Excellence In HIS Name HR LLC

Lead Employees to Excellence


Yes, it’s possible for you to lead employees to excellence at work, home and in their communities.

For we are God’s workmanship, created in Christ Jesus to do good works, which God prepared in advance for us to do. ~Ephesians 2:10

A valuable part of leading sustainable for-profit organizations is introducing your employees to community relations. Part of leading people is developing them to be the best they can be, not only in the workplace but within their families and communities as well.

Look at your people from a whole person perspective—they’re far more than just “workers.” Provide your people the opportunity to do good works, to achieve greatness in their lives, and they will do great things for you. Developing your people’s skills, both in and outside the company, can positively impact the communities in which they live and you do business.

Encourage your people to be their best in every aspect of their lives.

Many organizations now put programs in place that help match employees’ interests to community volunteer opportunities. Some organizations shut down for an entire week to help build homes with Habitat for Humanity, for example. What do you do? What more can you do?

Imagine an organization that inspired their people by running a contest where each employee participated by demonstrating how their volunteer organization is the most impactful. The prize? The winner would receive a considerable reward to help fund their efforts.  This article provides a great deal of information on what Elexio has done to encourage employees to look far outside their own communities.

If you are promoting good works performed by your employees, not only in the workplace but also in the world we live in, you are doing great things for God. You are building a “Kingdom-Minded” Organization.

Help our community of readers

Do you have HR practices that support these ideals? Do you help your employees help others? How do you find your employees’ strengths and match them to community involvement? Share your ideas and inspire fellow readers. We would love to know how you encourage your people to shine.

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Mark Griffin is founder and Chief Consultant at In His Name HR LLC. He has over 20 years of HR experience.  You can learn more about his recently published book for College Students, College to Career: The Student Guide to Career and Life Navigation HERE.  Follow Mark on FacebookTwitter and LinkedIn.

 

Conflict Resolution – Blessed Are the Peacemakers ~ 2019 ABHE Annual Meeting


 ABHE Annual Meeting
February 20-22, 2019 | Rosen Plaza Hotel, Orlando Florida

While never preferred, conflict seems a part of most every organization. What are prudent principles for peacemaking? What do expert HR leaders understand that makes resolution positive and developmental? Participants will learn from a veteran consultant:

  • Principles for positive conflict resolution
  • Insights gained from experience and research.
  • Warnings to heed and mistakes to avoid

Learn More Here 

 

Visit us- Booth 119 – ABHE Annual Meeting!

About the Speaker

Mark A. Griffin is the founder and chief consultant of In HIS Name HR LLC, a human resources outsourcing and career coaching firm created to help organizations pilot the complex issues of managing HR.

As a human resources professional with 20-plus years of experience in both public (Quaker Oats Company, Kodak Inc., Merck Inc.) and private companies (Woolrich, Conestoga Wood Specialties, Valco Companies Inc.), Mark is passionate about building high-performance workplaces by utilizing best practices while leading organizations with strong values.

Mark and his wife Gail have two adult children, and and attend LCBC Church. Mark has coached leaders on “Business as Mission” as far away as Eastern Europe, India, Haiti, Honduras, Nicaragua and the Dominican Republic.

Speaker, accomplished HR consultant, and the author of How to Build “Kingdom-Minded” Organizations and College to Career: The Student Guide to Career and Life Navigation, Mark A. Griffin encourages leaders to build values-led organizations during these increasingly complex times.

 

How to Increase Team Productivity with the MBTI Personality Test

How to Increase Team Productivity with the MBTI Personality Test


Personality clashes and disparate problem-solving styles are all too common, even in the most motivated organizations. Someone’s true character is often revealed in the way in which he or she acts and reacts in situations with others. The ripple effects can be devastating. They can even dam up the works altogether if you don’t take action—the right action.

Most conflicts stem from misunderstandings. By being proactive and decoding the personalities in your organization—that is, working to understand the different ways in which people see and understand the world while interacting with others, you can help your employees to work together harmoniously. When employees have a strong grasp of the personalities of their colleagues, they can leverage each other’s strengths and sharpen one another (Prov. 27:17).

 

Read The Full Post Here

 

 

Are Your Employees Mentored?

Are Your Employees Mentored? Employee Commitment Series


This blog series focuses on nine areas that keep employees committed to your organization. In our opinion, employees stay committed when they are Involved, Paid Well, Asked for Input, Challenged, Empowered, Trusted, Valued, Appreciated, and Mentored.

Employee Commitment Series

Do You Mentor Your Employees?

There are many factors that affect employee motivation and performance in the workplace. Although often overlooked, mentoring is one such factor. Mentored employees are employees who feel valued. As such, a mentorship program in your workplace is vital to employee happiness. In fact, workplace mentorship could be the catalyst you need to help your employees drive high performance.

What Is Workplace Mentoring?

Workplace mentoring is an organized learning partnership with employees. It involves sharing information, insights, knowledge, and experiences. The aim? To increase productivity and employee value.

All successful organizations have one trait in common—great leaders. But it doesn’t end there. To build a sustainable success, leaders must share their knowledge and values with employees. Mentoring is an effective way to pass on this knowledge.

Mentoring shouldn’t be restricted only to new employees. Even tenured employees often need guidance. The personalized leadership provided by a mentoring program can yield great rewards.

Why Is Workplace Mentoring Important?

Mentorship is vital to the culture of large enterprises and small organizations alike. A study conducted by the Chronus Corporationshows that mentorship programs are popular with Fortune 500 companies. In fact, about 71% of these companies offer organized mentorship programs. Another study, among Millennials, reveals that more than 79%think mentoring is crucial to attaining their career goals. But what benefits can you derive from having a mentorship program in your workplace?

Training Employees

To get the best results from your employees, there is no doubt you need to train them well. But the training doesn’t have to be through crash courses or organized seminars. Some of the most valuable knowledge we pick up as humans comes through informal settings.

A mentorship program provides the training avenue employees need. It’s through mentoring that employees gain or update the knowledge needed to perform at work.

Infusing Leadership Skills

Leadership is one of those skills that can’t always be learned effectively in a classroom. A mentoring program, however, is a great avenue through which employees can pick up invaluable skills. This can prove to be of great benefit to the organization in the long run, as a new generation of leaders is already saddled to handle the reins. Transitions can therefore be smoother and retirement gaps easier to fill.

Reducing Attrition

From a managerial perspective, reduced attrition is the most important benefit of a mentorship program. A potential for growth and development is one of the major motivational factors that ensure employees stick with an organization.

A mentorship program gives employees a necessary sense of belonging. Employees in a mentorship program believe they have a great potential for career progression, which helps them experience their work as rewarding and keeps them contentedly right where they are.

Putting a Mentorship Program in Place

So, think about this again: Do you mentor your employees? If your answer is no, or your yes carries a tinge of uncertainty, you have yet to maximize the productivity of your employees. Organize a mentorship program today. Get your HR department involved, develop a brilliant program, and watch as you achieve results you didn’t think were possible.

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In HIS Name HR helps organizations build high-performance Human Resources programs. Visit them at In HIS Name HR.

Mark A. Griffin is the founder and chief consultant of In HIS Name HR LLC. Connect with him on LinkedIn or Twitter.

Using a Third-Party Workplace Complaint Investigator Is Critical to Your Success

Using a Third-Party Workplace Complaint Investigator Is Critical to Your Success


No organization, no matter how well run, is immune to employee workplace complaints. Whether you employ fewer than 50 employees or manage thousands, some form of complaint will inevitably be filed at some point in your organizational existence. In our diverse experience with for-profit and nonprofit organizations, including colleges, universities, churches and ministries, we have witnessed complaints in a variety of areas, including:

  • Discrimination, such as on the basis of gender, disability, religion, race and age.
  • Harassment (sexual and non-sexual)
  • Bullying
  • Theft and other ethical impropriety
  • American with Disabilities Act
  • FMLA and medical-related leave issues
  • Retaliation

With the potential liability being so high, and the risk of negative publicity, the benefits of using an outside investigator are apparent: Outside investigators provide your organization credibility, privilege (confidentiality) protection and, most importantly, protect against employee perception of any retaliatory action by management.

Credibility

Using an outside investigator highlights that you, as an organization, take concerns of misconduct seriously. This proves to employees that you want to objectively find out what really happened and are willing to accept the consequences. An outside investigator is an independent fact-finder who plays no part in any next steps of discipline or future advancement opportunities. The investigator arrives at the workplace with a well-defined and articulated role: to objectively perform fact-finding, which includes collecting facts about a specific complaint and potentially any related complaints that might surface. That’s it.

An outside investigator’s only responsibility is that of a fact-finder. Why is this important? Because internal HR staff or management personnel would likely, when investigating, be viewed as less objective than an outside, neutral fact-finder. That means their investigation may never attain the credibility and objectivity required to withstand later scrutiny, should the matter reach employment litigation.

Privilege

Conducting a prompt, impartial and thorough investigation provides a solid affirmative defense to allegations of harassment and other misconduct, whereas when an investigation is performed by in-house or outside counsel, a conflict might arise, should litigation ensue. If the organization wants to use that investigation to show it did the right thing, a legitimate endeavor, it may find it has to waive attorney-client privilege with respect to strategic conversations. Using an outside investigator provides a bright barrier separating those sensitive discussions from the investigative process, so privilege can still be preserved.

When an investigation is offered as evidence that an employer responded appropriately to a complaint, the investigator might well be called as a witness at trial. If that investigator is also counsel for the organization, representation on that matter will likely be problematic. By using an outside investigator, the emotion is taken out of the equation. In His Name HR’s experienced investigators are independent of your organization, and that means no conflicts in terms of representation exist.

In His Name HR’s investigators are also well prepared for the eventuality of deposition or trial testimony. When the In His Name HR investigator is called, the employer feels confident because this investigator has conducted dozens of similar investigations where, in some instances, policy violations were found to have occurred and, in others, they did not. Our investigators refrain from using words like “we” and “us.” It becomes obvious to both judge and jury that there is no relationship that would cause the investigation to be guided in the organization’s favor. An outside investigator does not represent the organization, and their statements will be limited only to what they learned in the investigation—nothing else.

Retaliation

An employee who raises a concern is often poised to feel that the organization will retaliate against them for filing a complaint. Yet, in our experience, most human resources managers and other authority figures do not treat employees differently when concerns are aired about the organization, or even about individual managers.

Still, a complainant who has been overlooked for promotion months after the complaint may see things differently. We have met employees who participated in internal investigations who said that the internal investigator now “sees me as a problem or a complainer.” Most internal investigators are trained and prepared for this. However, whether real or perceived, it is an issue. Even if the internal investigator actually can separate what was said in the complaint, and operate objectively going forward, participants will likely never be convinced that the internal investigator can “unhear” what was said and not be influenced by it. On the other hand, using an outside investigator allows the organization to conduct a full investigation while the organization and employees carry on the business at hand without perceptions about the process weighing down the employee population.

Retain an Investigator

Cause for concern? It should be. We are all working in difficult times. Complaints are increasing almost daily. HR departments are overburdened. With the news escalating in the media surrounding harassment, discrimination and hostile work environments, employee complaints have now reached record levels.

Let us allay your concerns. Reach out to us and discuss having a trusted partner to help guide you and your Team in the event a complaint arises.

Contact us today. You—and your employees—will be glad you did.

In His Name HR helps organizations build high-performance human resource programs. Visit them at In HIS Name HR or e-mail them here.

Mark A. Griffin is the founder and chief consultant of In His Name HR LLC. Connect with him on LinkedIn and Twitter.