Book Rereleased in Spanish ~ WVCH Philadelphia PA


Live 3PM April 25, 2018

740 AM WVCH Philadelphia PA

Enjoy listening to Guest Mark A. Griffin discuss the rerelease of his book, How to Build “Kingdom-Minded” Organizations in Spanish with host Charlotte Cosden live at studio headquarters.

WVCH is a Blessing – Serving Greater Philadelphia and The Delaware Valley Christian Listeners for over 50 years!

Tune in and listen to WVCH’s weekly radio show “Be The Guest,” hosted by Charlotte Cosden.  In May 2012 How to Build “Kingdom-Minded” Organizations by Mark A. Griffin was published, and its success was significant that organizations across the US and UK now use it as a guide not just within leadership teams but also boards of directors.

Six years after its first publication, in response to popular demand, How to Build “Kingdom-Minded” Organizations has now been translated into Spanish.  Guest Mark A. Griffin, Chief Consultant at In HIS Name HR shared his experiences in helping shape organizations to be Christ centered and profitable.

With over 20 years of Human Resources experience at both fortune (Kodak, Quaker Oats, and Merck) as well as small and mid-sized companies, Mark has seen it all.

Podcast to be aired after the broadcast.

Preparing Your Organization For The Aging Workforce


Huge changes in the labor force draw near. Here’s how to get prepared!

Baby Boomers are a very influential demographic of people born after World War II, in the years 1946‒1964, and will soon represent a whopping 40 percent of the workforce. In 1950, only one in six workers were over the age of 55. In less than two decades, one of every four workers will be over age 55. Multigenerational organizations are now the norm, with many organizations employing people who are in their sixth or seventh decade of life.

The impact is enormous. It will continue to affect the workplace everywhere in the U.S. Some Boomers plan to retire, leaving giant gaps and a vortex-style “brain drain” across most industries. Others will stay working or shift to part-time employment, creating new challenges most organizations are unaware of or unequipped to handle. Either way, the costs could be devastating, so preparing now is crucial.

Activate These 3 Concepts to Avoid Trouble:

(1) Retention

Economic woes have resulted in most Boomers not being ready for retirement at the normal age range of 62 to 70. The AARP reports that a full 25 percent of Boomers have no savings on which to retire whatsoever, and a mere 14 percent plan to retire when the time comes. Nevertheless, only 52 percent of organizations have policies to rehire retired workers. Ensure that your organization is ready for this inevitability.

(2) Train for the Talent Gap

Many Boomers have vast working experience, crucial expertise, and command top pay. Too few organizations are utilizing Boomers to train younger workers while they are still around. Job mentoring, job shadowing, and job sharing with younger workers are three important options to make the transition less painful. Move quickly to create programs to train younger workers alongside Boomers before it’s too late. Additionally, more sophisticated recruitment and hiring programs are needed to find qualified and competent talent in a shrinking pool with a wider age spectrum.

(3) Accommodate

Most organizations are not prepared to accommodate aging workers; so work-related disability claims are expected to rise sharply. That’s expensive! Take steps now to create a safe and accommodating work environment to avoid injuries and to make working less stressful for an older workforce. A Human Resources consultant can assess what changes are necessary to avoid workplace injuries and boost morale.

Those Boomers who want to continue working often face discrimination and prejudice. In truth, this population typically comprises excellent workers who are far more flexible, able to learn, and more technologically savvy than the persisting stereotype would have us believe. Plus, employment laws protect them against unfair hiring practices. Avoid lawsuits and potential problems by knowing the law and complying with it. If you have not read this article regarding HR legal compliance, please do so.

According to the Sloan Center on Aging and Work, organizations can do a lot to ensure that Boomers work to an older age and do well on the job. Flexible work options, participation in decisions, chances to develop new skills and competencies, and regular engagement will help Boomers succeed in your organization for years to come. By valuing them properly, you will mutually reap the rewards.

As the demographic shifts, many organizations will experience disruption or harm—but it doesn’t have to be your organization! Right now is the time to make sure that you are prepared for the biggest demographic shift in the history of American labor.

 

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In His Name HR helps organizations build high performance Human Resources programs. Visit them at In HIS Name HR or e-mail them here.

Mark A. Griffin is the founder and chief consultant of In His Name HR LLC. Connect with him on LinkedIn or Twitter.

 

 

How To Ensure You Hire the Right Person


Find the right person for the right job!

It sounds simple, but it won’t come easily without planning and a process. Getting the wrong people not only kills performance but can also damage your reputation.

And, of course, you don’t have the money to do it wrong. Training misfit or unqualified new employees always costs more in the long run than hiring the right person in the first place. Additionally, turnover is higher if employees haven’t been recruited properly. Employees grow disappointed when their position is out of their depth or the job isn’t what they thought it would be. They leave as soon as they find a better fit.

How do you hire people the right way? How do you find talent well suited for your organization and its open job position?

Remember these 3 simple tips

(1) Develop and Finalize a Thorough Job Description.

Craft a job description that matches your need, using the two most critical modes:

  1. Use the right template from the beginning, each and every time you create a position, to ensure that all information necessary is covered; and
  2. Train employees to create their own descriptions, because they know their job better than anyone.

Without a clear job description, when employees discover that a lot more is expected of them, frustration and stress result. Draft a description that is not too generalized—vagaries only hurt your organization and catch new hires off guard.

At high-performance organizations, employees know why they are there and what their specific job duties are. The description should note expectations of the job, skills or education needed, and duties and related responsibilities; plus, who they report to, and when. Include how they will be evaluated, and who will train them or be available to consult if they run into trouble.

Realistically, not everything can be covered in a job description, add a segment stating that related duties and responsibilities may arise or exist that are not detailed in the job description. Otherwise, a worker may take advantage of a concise description to avoid putting in the necessary extra effort by claiming, “That’s not my job.”

(2) Filter Your Resumes

A filter is created from the core requirements of the job description. It gives the resume screener a baseline to efficiently weed out resumes and applications that don’t meet the minimum qualifications of the descriptions. Consider outsourcing the screening process to a professional firm that will funnel the best prospects to you, or enlist someone to handle the slush pile of applications, and then feed you the cream of the crop. Filtering the process is important.

(3) Memorialize the Recruiting Process

Develop key steps to use in the process every time to ensure recruitment efficiency and fairness. Consider including the steps within these four categories as you create your own organizational recruitment process:

How your candidate pool is created (job description, advertising, screening, etc.)

How the interview process is conducted (interview questions, background check consent, candidate evaluation forms, etc.)

How a selection is made (who decides on the new hire, how are they and other candidates notified, etc.)

The elements of your hiring process (pre-employment physical, drug and alcohol testing, notifications, etc.)

It pays to spend the time and money up front to ensure a well-tuned process. An outside Human Resources firm can set up all the details involved in your recruitment and hiring process to streamline and maximize the procedure. The result will be a clear and useful tool to boost organizational performance and save costs.

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In His Name HR helps organizations build high performance Human Resources programs. Visit them at In HIS Name HR or e-mail them here.

Mark A. Griffin is the founder and chief consultant of In His Name HR LLC. Connect with him on LinkedIn or Twitter.

 

 

Keep Your Human Resources Programs Legal and Compliant


Are you complying with all the proper state and federal labor laws?  If not, it could cost you everything.

Christian Higher Education is not immune from compliance.  And compliance is very important.  In our opinion Christian Higher Education may even be more susceptible to investigation then other organizations.

In large organizations, an entire human resources (HR) department navigates the complex minefield of federal and state labor laws. Some small organizations (under 100 employees) think of HR as an afterthought, or HR responsibilities like hiring, benefits, compliance, and payroll falls to a few people who aren’t properly trained. This can be a pricey mistake. Laws concerning overtime, unlawful termination, and equal rights are just a few areas that trip up organizations, big and small, all the time.

Labor laws fill volumes and are quite complex. Plus, labor laws vary from state to state! Even Walmart ran into trouble recently and incurred $4.83 million dollars in back wages, penalties, and fines for violating The Fair Labor Standards Act. The mistake? Managers were misclassified and not appropriately compensated for overtime work. Unlawful termination is another problem that has cost organizations like UPS, Carmike Cinemas, and Dial Corporation dearly. Yes, it’s tricky. Do you know the laws?

It gets worse—the government is ramping up efforts to check up on organizations and crack down. The Obama administration in 2017 allotted $25 million for the sole purpose of investigating those misclassified as “independent contractors,” hoping to reclaim alleged lost tax revenue and increase the IRS’s revenue. Be smart. Remember that stiff penalties and lawyer fees can decimate your organization. Are your workers properly classified?

Stay legal and remember these 3 key points:

  • Child labor, non-resident labor, and equal rights legislation are the three areas where many organizations most often fail to comply.
  • Both state and federal labor information is free and available online.
  • Outsourcing with an HR professional firm can save your organization a lot of time and money.

Most organizations with fewer than 100 people benefit from outsourcing labor law compliance and other human resource tasks to HR professionals. The alternative is risky: employees are often uninformed about and under-trained in labor law compliance. Look out! Federal fines could be in store for you. In addition, HR often falls outside an employee’s main job focus, so getting it wrong or spending valuable time away from primary tasks can cripple productivity in a small organization. Get the right person trained or on your team to comply with labor laws.

Regrettably, staying legal has never been more difficult or important.

Make 2018 your organization’s best year ever.  Make sure to get the Human Resources help you need right away.

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In His Name HR helps organizations build high performance Human Resources programs. Visit them at In HIS Name HR or e-mail them here.

Mark A. Griffin is the founder and chief consultant of In His Name HR LLC. Connect with him on LinkedIn or Twitter.

 

Mistakes Organizations Make When Establishing Core Values


Today, we build on the two previous posts, on creating Mission and Vision Statements by discussing Core Values and creating your organization’s Value Statement, which completes the triad.

When organizations desire to perform at the highest level, they leverage three (3) commitments—three commitments that set the stage for overall efficiency, growth, and prosperity.

Core Values focus on how you run your organization and interact with customers and suppliers. Not everyone possesses the same core values, so it’s important for an organization to stress what theirs are to employees, vendors, and customers at the onset of hiring, doing business, or providing a service.

Take this example: Facebook started out in a dorm room and, in just ten years, grew to having 1.23 billion monthly users, about one-sixth of the entire world’s population. To celebrate that accomplishment, Mark Zuckerberg expressed how a Core Value guided them along the way:

“…We just cared more about connecting the world than anyone else. And we still do today.”

With its expressed Value of caring, Facebook is guided toward their vision and mission of accomplishing bigger and more important goals. It is yet to be seen whether Facebook will be foiled by one of the 5 very common mistakes we are about to explore here.

Mistake # 1: Being too vague

Your Core Values should be both meaningful and easy to understand. So, if caring is a core value, what does “caring” really mean? Your Value statement should flesh this out in a simple and powerful way. Zuckerberg outlined his 5 Core Values as “The Hacker Way.”

 Mistake # 2: Lack of accountability

Your Core Values must be built into your performance management process or the oversight to ensure success will be sorely absent.

Mistake # 3: Creating too many Values

By limiting this list to reflect only your highest priorities, your core Values will be focused and accountability will increase.

It’s tempting to make a long list of Values that you think are important; however, when you keep the number to about three or four key items, you make enacting them easier and more likely.

Mistake # 4Failing to share core Values with prospective employees

Potential employees should know how things work and what it’s like at your organization from the start. When someone does not subscribe to your Values, don’t hire them.

Mistake # 5Not including a core Values preface statement

Some core Values can end up seeming disingenuous or hypocritical once mistakes are made. The best way to inoculate your organization from this is to disclose that possibility up front.

Include a preface statement like this:

“Although we strive for perfection, we sometimes miss the mark. When we do, we apologize and work to improve as we move forward. The following is a list of the values we strive to maintain.”

Your students, instructors, vendors, customers, and employees will appreciate your honesty and be more likely to give you the benefit of the doubt, should problems arise.

Core Value Statements are crucial to the culture of your organization and shouldn’t be taken lightly. The best way to ensure that your trio of Mission, Vision, and Value Statements will succeed is to ensure they are integrated into all you do from an HR perspective.

By avoiding the common mistakes and using top-notch methods, you’ll ensure that employees can achieve your Mission and Vision by adhering to the core Values most important to your organization. A high-performing organization is one that can last and even thrive in tough economic times. It must by guided carefully using processes that ensure consistency and stability through the Values you hold most dear.

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In His Name HR helps organizations build high performance Human Resources programs. Visit them at In HIS Name HR or e-mail them here.

Mark A. Griffin is the founder and chief consultant of In His Name HR LLC. Connect with him on LinkedIn or Twitter.

 

 

Executive Assistant to the President Lancaster, PA


We are excited to be retained by this wonderful organization, Veritas Press to assist in recruiting a Executive Assistant to the President for their Lancaster Pennsylvania corporate office.

Veritas Press is a Christian organization dedicated to providing the best classical Christian education materials and services anywhere.

Learn about the great benefits of working for Veritas here! 

The Executive Assistant to the President will assist the President and Executive VP along with executive team as needed.

Some Responsibilities Include:

Personal Assistant:

  1. Serve as a personal assistant to the president and executive vice president to conserve their time and promote the corporate image by representing them internally and externally; providing liaison between the president, key executives, and employees.
  2. Represent the president by welcoming visitors, reviewing correspondence; arranging company dinners and other corporate functions; answering questions and meeting requests directed to the president.
  3. Help key executives make consistent decisions by advising them of historical precedents; serving as liaison between them and the president.
  4. Arrange corporate and personal travel and meetings by developing itineraries and agendas; scheduling transportation; arranging lodging and meeting accommodations.

Administrative:

  1. Scan and Forward any invoices received via mail and all packing slips to the Financial Assistant.
  2. Scan and deposit all checks received.
  3. Assist in sending emails to large groups utilizing current software.

Reception:

  1. Receive all guests to Veritas Press.
  2. Maintain Visitor Log as directed.

Office Maintenance and Supplies:

  1. Order supplies as needed.
  2. Maintain organization of curriculum library.
  3. Maintain break room and supply room tidiness.
  4. Facilitate office cleaning with 3rd party vendor.
  5. Opens, sorts and delivers all corporate mail.

Projects:

  1. Utilizes project management software as directed.
  2. Assists with data entry within project management software.
  3. Coordinates and helps facilitate projects within project management software as directed by project lead.

Human Resources:

  1. Assists new employee onboarding as directed.
  2. Compiles new employee paperwork packet.
  3. Maintains employee files.
  4. Assists Director of Operations with administration of benefits.

Some Requirements Include:

  1. A bachelor’s degree is preferred, but not required.
  2. Conversant with and supportive of the reformed faith and classical Christian education according to the VPSA Statement of Faith and Philosophy.
  3. Excellent written and oral communication skills.
  4. Moderate mathematical skills and the ability to apply them to practical situations
  5. Able to work diligently without direct supervision.
  6. Proficient in handling detailed work.
  7. Wiling to continually learn various types of software.
  8. Experience with typical MS Office Suite products, Gmail, general computer skills, etc.
  9. Work to constantly expand abilities by gaining further training in areas of weakness.
  10. General account/bookkeeping experience is helpful.

Veritas employees always go the extra mile to serve their client’s educational needs. Want to join a winning team? Join Veritas today.

Location Will Be:

Veritas Press
1805 Olde Homestead Lane
Lancaster, PA 17601

Click For Map 

Due to the overwhelming response we anticipate we ask that you are patient during the selection and interview process. All qualified applicants will be notified.

All qualified individuals may submit a resume and cover letter which includes why you should be considered for the position and what would make you the best candidate to:

Email HR@InHISNameHR.com

Veritas Press is an Equal Opportunity Employer.

Want to get future vacancies and blog updates?  Subscribe here: Click

 

 

$305,000 in Employer Fines Upheld for I-9 Violations In HIS Name HR

$305,000 in Employer Fines Upheld for I-9 Violations


$305,000 in Employer Fines Upheld for I-9 Violations

Human resources can be complicated these days. Few would argue with that. But sometimes it’s the most basic human resources processes that can cause the greatest damage to any organization when not done right. And that disaster can be compounded if you lack a skilled professional to provide oversight.

When I say any organization, that includes any college, university, church, ministry, hospital, nonprofit or for-profit company, and even youth camps. Small organizations are not immune. No matter what size or kind of organization you are, if you employ staff, you must be diligent in following state and federal employment laws.

Recently, DLS Precision Fab, an LLC in Phoenix, Arizona, assumed they had made the right decision in hiring what appeared to be a seasoned HR professional. Much to their chagrin, despite his credentials, the human resources professional they hired proved inept and derelict in his duties when it came to maintaining the administration of the firm’s I-9s.

What is an I-9, you ask? Well, if you employ people and don’t know what an I-9 is, that’s a huge red flag, right there! Here is the definition as provided by ICE, the U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement:

Form I-9 is used for verifying the identity and employment authorization of individuals hired for employment in the United States. All U.S. employers must ensure proper completion of Form I-9 for each individual they hire for employment in the United States. This includes citizens and noncitizens. Both employees and employers (or authorized representatives of the employer) must complete the form. (Source)

We, as an established HR firm, are continually astonished that organizations think that because they are a school, church, camp, or nonprofit, the I-9 is not a requirement. The law clearly states: “All employers must complete and retain Form I-9, Employment Eligibility Verification, for every person they hire for employment on or after Nov. 6, 1986, in the U.S., as long as the person works for pay or other type of payment.”

All employers must have I-9s for every employee, regardless of the employer type or size!

Back to the case concerning DLS in Arizona, they were in a growth mode and had conscientiously made an effort to comply with state and federal employment laws by hiring an HR professional to handle compliance. Unfortunately, as the appeal by DLS states, the HR professional failed in his duties:

DLS is a company located in Phoenix, Arizona, providing custom sheet metal fabrication in a variety of industries. In the late 2000s, DLS grew to about 200 employees because of the expansion of a Department of Defense program. To deal with the sudden growth of its workforce and ensure its compliance with applicable state and federal employment laws, DLS hired a well-credentialed human resources director (the “HR director”). Unbeknownst to the company, however, this individual shirked his responsibility to ensure the company’s compliance with the INA to the point, as later described by DLS, “of literally stuffing the government’s correspondence in a drawer and never responding.”

Their legal problems started in 2009, when ICE served DLS with a notice of inspection and an administrative subpoena. After the onsite visit and a thorough review of their I-9 forms, DLS was served a notice of suspect documents. In October 2012, ICE served a notice of intent to fine.

DLS quickly responded by requesting a hearing before an administrative law judge, and ICE countered by filing a six-count complaint alleging that the employer failed to comply with employment verification requirements and continued to employ 15 individuals despite knowing they were ineligible for employment, all in violation of the Immigration Nationality Act.

Now, in 2017, in an attempt to reverse the violations, DLS Precision Fab appealed—and promptly lost. Richard Clifton, assigned to the case through the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals found DLS Precision Fab liable for 504 of the 508 alleged violations, 489 of which were I-9 paperwork violations and 15 of which involved DLS Precision Fab’s ongoing employment of ineligible aliens. As a result of the actions of the so-called HR professional, DLS Precision Fab was ordered to pay civil money penalties totaling more than $305,000.

Understandably, this has landed the company in dire straights, and it is now is in the midst of Chapter 11 bankruptcy proceedings. While we can’t be sure that these violations are solely responsible for the bankruptcy filing, it certainly hasn’t helped, adding to their already stressed organizational longevity.

Perhaps, like DLS, you assume your HR staff are competent and on top of complying with all your legal requirements. But are you sure?

The first thing you should you do is have all of your HR processes independently audited by a human resources processional, one with the right experience. We can help. Our HR Assessment, conducted by our skilled team of HR professionals will determine whether you’re protected or at great risk. We help clients across the country. Don’t hesitate—it could be costly.

Contact us today to find out more, and learn about our HR Assessment here.

 

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In His Name HR helps organizations build high performance Human Resources programs. Visit them at In HIS Name HR or e-mail them here.

Mark A. Griffin is the founder and chief consultant of In His Name HR LLC. Connect with him on LinkedIn or Twitter.

Grace and Wisdom When Right-Sizing Your Staff  ~ 2018 ABHE Annual Meeting


 ABHE Annual Meeting
February 21-23, 2018 | Rosen Plaza Hotel, Orlando Florida

Right-sizing – an organizational lifesaver . . . or toxic solution to financial difficulties? But when layoffs are not well thought out and used repeatedly without a graceful strategy, right sizing can destroy an organization’s effectiveness. How you treat people really matters – to the people who leave and perhaps most critically, to the people who remain.
• Taking steps – simple, impactful, and timely to make the process gracefully effective
• Executing a comprehensive communication plan – to students, faculty, employees, alumni and community
• Supporting displaced employees
• Caring for employees who remain
• Avoiding common pitfalls observed in other organizations

Learn More Here 

 

Visit us- Booth 119 – ABHE Annual Meeting!

About the Speaker

Mark A. Griffin is the founder and chief consultant of In HIS Name HR LLC, a human resources outsourcing and career coaching firm created to help organizations pilot the complex issues of managing HR.

As a human resources professional with 20-plus years of experience in both public (Quaker Oats Company, Kodak Inc., Merck Inc.) and private companies (Woolrich, Conestoga Wood Specialties, Valco Companies Inc.), Mark is passionate about building high-performance workplaces by utilizing best practices while leading organizations with strong values.

Mark and his wife Gail have two adult children, and and attend LCBC Church. Mark has coached leaders on “Business as Mission” as far away as Eastern Europe, India, Haiti, Honduras, Nicaragua and the Dominican Republic.

Speaker, accomplished HR consultant, and the author of How to Build “Kingdom-Minded” Organizations and College to Career: The Student Guide to Career and Life Navigation, Mark A. Griffin encourages leaders to build values-led organizations during these increasingly complex times.

 

Recruiting in Today's Economy In HIS Name HR LLC

Recruiting in Today’s Economy ~ 2018 Faith Based Nonprofit Resource Center Conference


Faith Based Nonprofit Resource Center Conference

May 30th 2018

The Embassy Suites Newark, DE

It’s no secret that your Nonprofit wants to succeed. It also should be no surprise that your employees want to succeed! Of course, there’s often a strong, positive relationship between the two—when employees succeed, so do the Nonprofit’s they serve.

A key question, then, becomes: How can organizations most effectively find, train, motivate and encourage employees’ success?

Topics To Be Covered

  • Marketing your Nonprofit in today’s difficult labor situation.
  • What should we have in place to be attractive?
  • Where are Nonprofit finding employees?
  • What are the three most important steps of an effective hiring process?

This presentation will also help prepare people within your organization who may want to move into a HR role. The presentation is highly interactive (includes table exercises) and gives participants the opportunity to collaborate with other organizations.

 

Learn More Here

 

About the Speaker

Mark A. Griffin is the founder and chief consultant of In HIS Name HR LLC, a human resources outsourcing and career coaching firm created to help organizations pilot the complex issues of managing HR.

As a human resources professional with 20-plus years of experience in both public (Quaker Oats Company, Kodak Inc., Merck Inc.) and private companies (Woolrich, Conestoga Wood Specialties, Valco Companies Inc.), Mark is passionate about building high-performance workplaces by utilizing best practices while leading organizations with strong values.

Mark and his wife Gail have two adult children, and and attend LCBC Church. Mark has coached leaders on “Business as Mission” as far away as Eastern Europe, India, Haiti, Honduras, Nicaragua and the Dominican Republic.

Speaker, accomplished HR consultant, and the author of How to Build “Kingdom-Minded” Organizations and College to Career: The Student Guide to Career and Life Navigation, Mark A. Griffin encourages leaders to build values-led organizations during these increasingly complex times.

Mistakes in High-Performance Vision Statements


Today, we’ll look at the 3 biggest mistakes commonly made by organizations during the creation of their Vision Statement.

As discussed in the last post, Organizations wanting to perform at the highest level do so by working to leverage 3 commitments. These commitments set the stage for overall efficiency, growth, and prosperity.

Mission Statement

Vision Statement

Core Values

Great leaders vision-cast for their organization.

They have an idea of where they want their organization to be down the road. They chart their desired course ahead of time. The best leaders will map out their Vision, put this Vision on paper, and share their Vision with the entire crew. However, too many leaders fail to be precise—they don’t follow a top-notch process to ensure their Vision truly comes to fruition.

Mistakes You Want to Avoid

Mistake #1: Developing a Vision Statement that isn’t achievable in the near future—within an employee’s working lifetime.

This is a bad idea. Instead of a far-off Vision as the organizational aim, your employees need to envision achieving the goal far sooner, so they can potentially experience the achievement as part of the team.

No employee wants to think that they are expected to work hard to achieve an organization’s Vision without still being around to celebrate it happening. If the goal lies too far into the future, employees don’t feel invested in the outcome. They don’t feel committed to it. Instead, it gets shelved and ignored. With an achievable goal, hope, motivation, and perseverance are ignited. They can see your destination on the horizon. Your excitement will become theirs.

When creating a Vision statement, make it achievable. Once it’s achieved, make sure you revisit it and make any adjustments and corrections to it as you move forward.

Mistake #2: The Vision statement is not included in the hiring and recruitment processes.

As you build your team, make sure that your potential employees know the direction your organization is headed; starting the moment they first step through the door. Let them know where they’re going when they first get onboard. It’s not enough to expect them to figure it out by osmosis. Don’t leave your Vision to chance. Tell them up front what it is and the role they will play in achieving it.

Your Vision statement must be seamlessly incorporated into your hiring practices and documents. If it is not obvious from the start, you risk spending a lot of time, energy, and money acquiring people who don’t know where you’re going and don’t care. Your organization will be rudderless.

Your Vision Statement is an invaluable motivator for your employees. Would you want to board a ship or a plane without knowing the destination ahead of time? Your employees won’t want to either.

As a leader, you are the captain. Your crew—your employees—and your passengers—your customers—must be informed as to the destination of your journey and be enthusiastic about it.

This is how high performance gets started!

Mistake # 3: Failing to integrate your commitment to your organization’s Core Values and Mission Statement into your Vision Statement—not making it a complete, holistic package.

A Vision statement should articulate two crucial items in addition to your Vision: your Mission statement and the core Values guiding your organization.

These three components are interdependent and must work together as a team. Just like a top coach wouldn’t play merely one-third of his football squad in the Super Bowl, it is not possible to create a high-performing organization from the ground up if it lacks any of these three key components.

The success of your Vision is important to your future—much too important to omit any of the key supporting pieces and risk it failing.

If creating these three documents sounds like a lot to bite off, don’t be discouraged! Human Resources experts exist to help you, and resources exist to make it easier. The best ones guide you through the whole process, just like the one I created with my team. We’ve done the foundational work for you to make it all happen smoothly and simply. Our HR Mastery Toolkit teaches and guides you to implement the best practices used by some of the top, most successful organizations in the world.

We begin with this essential first task: establishing your organization’s Mission, Vision, and Values.

By using a top-notch process to create your Vision Statement, you’ll set the stage for your employees to achieve it.

In the next post, we will continue examining this critical trio. I’ll give you some of the expertise I’ve gleaned from more than twenty years in the field of human resources. Come back to read: Mistakes Organizations Make When Determining Their Core Values.

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Join us at the 2018 Annual ABACC Conference at the Wyndham Orlando Florida Resort (International Drive). We will be exhibiting at this informative conference February 13 through February 16, 2018. Learn more here.

We will also be speaking (Grace and Wisdom When Right-Sizing Your Staff) and exhibiting for the ABHE Annual Meeting February 21-23, 2018 at the Rosen Plaza Hotel, Orlando Florida  Learn more here.

Contact us directly to set up a personal meeting in advance of the annual meeting. Looking forward to creating new friends and fostering deeper relationships with contacts we know.

In His Name HR helps organizations build high performance Human Resources programs. Visit them at In HIS Name HR or e-mail them here.

Mark A. Griffin is the founder and chief consultant of In His Name HR LLC. Connect with him on LinkedIn or Twitter.