Mar 17, 2013

6 Tips For Breaking Into the HR Profession

 Success In HR

 

Many people are eager to start a career in HR, but often don’t know what steps to take to break into the profession. 

If you are in this situation or know someone who is, this article will provide some helpful hints. 

Finding a job in HR is easiest for those with an HR-related college degree.  Frankly, in most cases, even an advanced degree and/or HR certification is increasingly becoming the preferred credential.

I am honored to have been a guest blogger on Alan Collins blog.

 

Enjoy reading the entire post here!

 

Dec 14, 2012

Got Vision?

Got Vision?
All successful companies must have a vision at the heart of their organization.  This vision shapes the culture of an organization  and acts as a guide to employees and management.

Companies with a vision have a workplace of direction, purpose and achievement. These companies know where they want to be and do the appropriate things to get there. All along the way, they have employees who are enthusiastically a part of it, in eager support of the vision.

But what about you? Do you have a vision for yourself? Do you have goals?

Nov 16, 2012

It’s Never Too Late To Make The Best Career Choice…

 Success In HR

As an HR consultant, I often coach people in their forties who have suddenly realized that they are working at a job they hate.  After many years of serving in their field and suffering through many years of discontent, they recognize how truly unhappy they have been.

Many times, people blame their unhappiness and professional dissatisfaction on other people, such as their bosses or co-workers, or their companies, when the root cause lies in the fact that…

They are simply working in the wrong field!

I am honored to have been a guest blogger on Alan Collins blog.

Enjoy reading the entire post here!

Aug 21, 2012

For the Unemployed Millions Seeking Strength for the Journey

Devotions for Job Seekers

We have been asked by Judson Press to help get the word out about their recent publication, “Help Wanted: Devotions for Job Seekers”.  Having career coached hundreds of job seekers for the past 8 years, I appreciate this valuable resource now available for job seekers.  We are including a sample for you to review, please share with those you know who might need encouragement in these tumultuous  economic times.

On July 9, 2012, Businessweek.com posted, “Recent reports have signaled the U.S. recovery is weakening.” The nation’s unemployment rate remains at 8.2%, meaning 12.7 million Americans are out of work. Whether one is a recent college graduate or an experienced worker, the stress of a job search can be overwhelming. To energize, equip, and encourage those who are unemployed, underemployed, or badly employed, career counselor Aaron M. Basko has written Help Wanted: Devotions for Job Seekers.

This inspirational volume provides 60 days of encouragement and advice for job seekers and career changers. Using Scripture verses, practical suggestions, and honest anecdotes, the author seeks to strengthen faith and renew hope during the job hunt.

In the book’s foreword, R. Paul Stevens, marketplace mentor and author of The Other Six Days, Doing God’s Business, Taking Your Soul to Work, and Work Matters writes: “In this extraordinary volume Aaron Basko has crafted a holistic process of reflection, action and spiritual development that could serve us all in the lifelong pilgrimage of finding the right fit for our daily work.”

Also praising the book, business coach Craig Simons and author Katherine Simons (Loving Your Neighbor: A Faith Community’s Response to the Unemployment Crisis), note, “The personal stories are alive and effective in drawing readers to our source of comfort and encouragement. The advice in One Small Step for Today challenges the reader to apply practical and necessary discipline to the job search.”

Order on-line at Judson Press.   Or download the sampler below.

Download The Sampler Here

Apr 20, 2012

The New Career Normal

 The New Career Normal It was a gray day in the fall of 2003. I looked around the room at all the other walking wounded, the outplaced, downsized, reorganized and laid off comrades I had come to know during the past several weeks. As we were heading into the Christmas season, I would say in jest that we were just stuck in the land of misfit toys. It was funny for a few seconds, until the stark reality of the situation struck our hearts.

There may be times in your career  when you find yourself stuck in the land of misfit toys.

We were participants in outplacement with the firm of Lee Hecht Harris, tucked neatly into the suburbs of Detroit, where thousands would need their services over the next decade. The firm would, of course, enjoy prosperity; however, it was unfortunately at the expense of others. James Craft, the leader of the misfit toys or, better stated, Career Coach, would lead us through this difficult time. Some folks would come and go fairly quickly, but, for the most part, many came but  few left.

One key takeaway from my weeks of time with the group and James was something that James harped over again and again: Don’t put your eggs in one basket — diversify your career and time into different areas. Although he made the importance clear to start a side hobby business, invest in a franchise outside your daily job, create a plan to have multiple streams of income, etc., I really did not get it until almost 10 years later. James, I believe, was a visionary; he knew what was coming to the workplace years in advance. But I, like many others, still had an eye toward the past, and yearned for a long-term relationship with a company, just like my father had had.

I guess it was because, in my heart, in my core, my own desire would be to do just that, devote 30 years to a company and then retire. I was still thinking how people should be able to give their time and years of service to the company and have the company return the favor with security. Today’s reality is that only a very small portion of people in the workplace will realize this rare relationship. It is no longer the norm, and definitely scarcer than it was back in 2003.

It is highly unlikely that you will work for one company for the rest of your life. 

It won’t happen. Even people who went into the military and government service are now finding no long-term commitment there. Layoffs have started and will continue in these sectors. As a result, you will work longer than your parents had to work. So, you had best like what you’re doing, because you will be doing it for a long time! Most important, you are going to require multiple income streams to make it. A paycheck is not going to cut it. The quicker you figure this out, accept it and embrace it, the better off you are. Don’t be like me and wait almost 10 years! If I had listened to James, I would be further ahead in developing these streams than I am today.

So what has transpired since 2003 for my own career path? Well, most significant is that I have given my life to Jesus. My personal desire for security through employers has been released and traded for the eternal security of Jesus in my heart. I have navigated through an additional downsizing, followed by two other companies; both of which have shrunk considerably because of the changes in manufacturing coupled with the downturn in the economy.

One way to diversify yourself and enhance your capabilities is by volunteering. I have donated much of my time over the past seven years helping job seekers who have either been laid off, downsized or are just plain unhappy with what they are doing career-wise. By doing so, I inadvertently developed my career coaching skills and also created a model to help people navigate the exploration of the difficult task of redefining their career path.

I have also created various forms of cash streams. A good friend of mine, Allan Collins, of Success in HR, calls it “side hustling.” It means finding something you enjoy doing and monetizing it. Allan sold comic books for years, diversifying his income. Many people start an eBay business or an online portal selling specialty items. I started a Internet Media Business separate from my HR consulting firm that not only provides a cash flow for my retirement savings, but also prospers the sales agent and gives back to a counseling ministry for each sale made.

I launched an additional offering in conjunction with my HR firm, based on my 20-plus years of coaching job seekers: ChristianCareerCoaching.com. This has proved a success for my business beyond my expectations but, as important, has made great impact in righting people in their careers.

I believe that God wants us to be happy at work! 

Work should not be awful. If it is, God is telling us to make a change! 

This new normal requires continuing education, as well. I was fortunate to have received a BA in Human Resources and a Masters in Business Administration. Several years into my career, I attended several Executive Education programs at the University of Michigan. But, after those formal programs, I did little in furthering my knowledge. I did become Green belt, qualified in Six Sigma, and taught many programs through the years in the subject areas of Finance, Human Resources, Supervision, and Training and Development. But delivering training is not the same as working in that field. Except for the occasional seminar, I felt myself stagnating. So, just recently, I invested in myself and my firm and spent time becoming a certified practitioner in the Myers Briggs Type Instrument (MBTI). It was well worth the time and dollar investment, as I increased my skills and my credibility with my clients.

So, the new normal as I see it is that you cannot rely any longer on a long-term commitment by an employer. It is statistically improbable. Volunteer and enrich yourself and others. Follow James’s and Allan’s advice and create a “side hustling” cash stream. And, finally, never stop learning. Step out of your comfort zone and rekindle your relationship with learning. Enter a Master’s program, get certified on a program, get a license for use of a program, or become a practitioner of a tool that can enhance your marketability. If you do all of these, you will become more resilient to the New Career Normal.

Before publishing this, I shared this with several people, all of whom have considered at least one of these points. What are your thoughts? Is there a new normal we are missing? We would love to hear your opinion.

Mar 28, 2012

Got Vision? Personal Visions and Goals

 

Vision and Goals

Many people think about them, but very few actually have them. Personal Visions and Goals. Personal Visions are important to have. If you have one and focus on it often, you will ultimately steer your life toward obtaining it.

Think of your vision as your compass, your GPS, or — my personal favorite — a lighthouse at the beach, to lead you through the storms and past the rocky ocean waves you’ll encounter as you make your way toward your final destination.

In developing your vision, ask yourself:

What do I want?

It may sound like a simple enough question, but it’s one of the toughest to answer.

So, ask yourself again.

What do I really, really, truly want for myself?

If I could have the kind of life that would make my heart sing, what would it look like?

At this point, your heart may be beating a bit faster. Can you really have that kind of life?

Yes, I believe you can. I’ve done it and I’ve helped a lot of clients lead passionate and fulfilling lives. It starts by defining what that life could look like.

Now, let’s talk goals. You must establish personal goals in order to get to where you want to go, as outlined in your Vision. As an example, here are some parts of my vision and related goals this year:

  • Start a business that will grow itself, ultimately turning it into a non-profit;
  • Manage time more effectively to end my work day by 5PM in order to spend more time with my wife and daughter;
  • Finish and publish my book;
  • Expand my prayer life by surrounding myself with prayer experts;
  • Spend quality time with my wife by planning two weekends away with each other;
  • Attend at least one in-person seminar or conference to further hone my skills or personal growth;
  • Share how to build “Kingdom Minded” organizations by speaking at ten to twelve events or radio stations this year;
  • Do a five-night backpacking trip;
  • Grow my social media presence by 20 percent;

Give yourself permission to dream about your ideal life, even if you spend just five to ten minutes a day, and consider the  following:

  1. What really is my relationship with God? Have I put my full trust in Him?
  2. If I could have more of something in my life, what would it be?
  1. What should I eliminate from my life for good?
  2. Which relationships do I need to nurture, or which ones should I release?
  3. What is my relationship to money?
  1. My secret passion or dream is…
  2. What am I most afraid of?
  3. What habits should I quit?
  4. What can I do to bring more joy into my daily life?
  5. What am I grateful for?

These questions are just a starting point, so take into account all major aspects of your life – friends and family (immediate and extended), church friends, charity work and, of course, fun and recreation. Also, examine thoughts centering on your daily career, activities, spending habits, your personal wellness and fitness, spirituality, and, of course, your spouse.

Got Vision?  We would love to know if you have walked through this process before.  What was the outcome?  Be a difference maker today and inspire a reader by leaving us comments.   Have a great week.